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The Executive Office of the President

The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20500
http://www.whitehouse.gov

Annual Report to Congress on White House Office Personnel

Annual Report to Congress on White House Office Personnel

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/July-1-2020-Report-FINAL.pdf

The report carries a date of June 26, 2020, and it discloses the status (e.g., employee or detailee), salary, pay basis, and title of staff members who are associated with the Executive Office of the President.

The report carries a date of June 26, 2020, and it discloses the status (e.g., employee or detailee), salary, pay basis, and title of staff members who are associated with the Executive Office of the President.

Official Congressional Directory—115th Congress (2017–2018)

Official Congressional Directory—115th Congress (2017–2018)
https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CDIR-2018-10-29/pdf/CDIR-2018-10-29-STATISTICALINFORMATION-13.pdf

The Portable Document Format (PDF) file is available on the Government Publishing Office's govinfo website. The Executive Office of the President is part of the "Executive Branch," which is grouped with the "Departments." The PDF file carries a date of October 29, 2018.

The Portable Document Format (PDF) file is available on the Government Publishing Office's govinfo website. The Executive Office of the President is part of the "Executive Branch," which is grouped with the "Departments." The PDF file carries a date of October 29, 2018.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On April 3, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt approved Public Law 76–19, which is also cited as the Reorganization Act of 1939. The Act reorganized Government agencies to save money: "The Congress hereby declares that by reason of continued national deficits beginning in 1931 it is desirable to reduce substantially Government expenditures and that such reduction may be accomplished . . . by proceeding immediately under the provisions of this Act" (53 Stat. 561). The reorganization sought to reduce expenditures and maintain efficient operation of Government; to increase efficiency of the operations of Government as much as possible within the revenues available; to group, coordinate, and consolidate Government agencies according to major purposes; to reduce the number of agencies through consolidation and termination; and to eliminate overlap and duplication.

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/76th-congress/session-1/c76s1ch36.pdf

On June 7, 1939, President Roosevelt approved Public Resolution 76–20, which acknowledged that "reorganization plan numbered I" had been submitted to the U.S. Congress on April 25, 1939, and that "reorganization plan numbered II" had been submitted on May 9, 1939. The joint resolution made the provisions of these two reorganization plans effective on July 1, 1939.

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/76th-congress/session-1/c76s1ch193.pdf

Under authority of the Reorganization Act of 1939, the President's two reorganization plans transferred various agencies to the Executive Office of the President. The contents of Reorganization Plan I and Reorganization Plan II of 1939 are codified in the appendix of 5 U.S.C.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title5/title5a/node84&edition=prelim

The National Archives published President Roosevelt's two reorganization plans that he had prepared and transmitted to the Senate and the House of Representatives, the first on April 25 and the second on May 9, in the Federal Register (4 FR 2727–2733) on July 1, 1939.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1939-07-01/pdf/FR-1939-07-01.pdf

On September 8, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an order that established five standing divisions of the Executive Office of the President and defined their functions and duties. The National Archives published Executive Order No. 8248 in the Federal Register (4 FR 3864) 4 days later.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1939-09-12/pdf/FR-1939-09-12.pdf

Presidents have continued to use Executive orders, reorganization plans, and legislative initiatives for reorganizing the Executive Office of the President to make its composition compatible with their administrative goals.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/the-executive-branch

REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Rules and regulations that affect the Executive Office of the President are codified in the first chapter, sections 100–199, of 3 CFR.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=6d49df89015aa267bedec9a29f6a2662&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title03/3chapterI.tpl

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of organizations in the Executive Office of the President have been assigned to record group 429.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/429.html

Budget Submissions

Congressional budget submissions that the Executive Office of the President prepared for Fiscal Year 2020 and 2021 are available in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading at the bottom of the "Disclosures" web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/disclosures

Career Opportunities

Applicants seeking noncareer positions may contact the Trump Administration by using an electronic form.

https://apply.whitehouse.gov

Information on the White House internship program is available online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/internships

Contact Information

An electronic form is available on the "Contact the White House" web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact

Federal Register

Significant documents and documents that the Executive Office of the President recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/executive-office-of-the-president

Social Media

The White House has a Facebook account.

https://www.facebook.com/WhiteHouse

The White House tweets announcements and other newsworthy items on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/whitehouse

Staff Salaries

Annual reports to Congress on White House Personnel from 2017 through 2020 are available in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading at the bottom of the "Disclosures" web page. The reports contain the name, status, salary, pay basis, and position title of a number of people who were, and may still be, associated with the Executive Office of the President.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/disclosures

White House Office

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20500

202-456-1414
http://www.whitehouse.gov

CHIEF OF STAFF Mark R. Meadows
Counsel to the President Pasquale A. Cipollone
Deputy Director Christopher J. Abbott
Deputy Director Timothy R. Frank
National Security Advisor Robert C. O'Brien

COUNSELORS TO THE PRESIDENT Kellyanne E. Conway *
Hope C. Hicks
Derek S. Lyons

SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVES
Disaster Recovery Peter J. Brown
International Negotiations Avrahm J. Berkowitz

SPEECHWRITERS Brittany L. Baldwin
Theodore M. Royer

Cabinet Secretary Kristan K. Nevins
Chief of Staff to the First Lady Stephanie A. Grisham
Deputy Counsel to the President for National Security Affairs John A. Eisenberg
Deputy National Security Adviser Matthew F. Pottinger
Press Secretary Kayleigh M. Gilmartin
Special Assistant to the President for Presidential Appointments and Scheduling Abigail R. Bacak

ASSISTANTS TO THE PRESIDENT

ASSISTANTS TO THE PRESIDENT
Brittany L. Baldwin *
Avrahm J. Berkowitz
Kellyanne E. Conway
Emma K. Doyle
Alyssa A. Farah
Robert Gabriel, Jr. *
Kayleigh M. Gilmartin
Stephanie A. Grisham
Hope C. Hicks
Nicholas F. Luna
Derek S. Lyons
John D. McEntee II
Mark R. Meadows
Stephen Miller
Kristan K. Nevins
Robert C. O'Brien
Anthony M. Ornato
Joy E. Otaño *
Matthew F. Pottinger
Brooke L. Rollins
Theodore M. Royer *
Daniel J. Scavino
Amy H. Swonger

Economic Policy Lawrence A. Kudlow
Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Julia Nesheiwat **
Planning and Implementation John C. Fleming, Jr.
Trade and Manufacturing Policy Peter K. Navarro

DEPUTY CHIEFS OF STAFF

DEPUTY CHIEFS OF STAFF
Communications Daniel J. Scavino
Operations Anthony M. Ornato
Policy Coordination Christopher P. Liddell
Policy to the First Lady Emma K. Doyle

DIRECTORS

DIRECTORS
Domestic Policy Council Brooke L. Rollins, Acting
Legislative Affairs Amy H. Swonger, Acting
Office of the Senior Advisor for Policy Robert Gabriel, Jr.
Oval Office Operations Nicholas F. Luna
Presidential Personnel John D. McEntee II
Strategic Communications Alyssa A. Farah
White House Management and Administration Monica J. Block
White House Military Office Rear Adm. Keith B. Davids
White House Personnel Joy E. Otaño

SENIOR ADVISORS

SENIOR ADVISORS
Timothy R. Frank
Jared C. Kushner

International Economic Affairs Merry S. Lin
Policy Stephen Miller
Records Management Paul S. Raizk
https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/July-1-2020-Report-FINAL.pdf

The White House Office serves the President in the performance of the many detailed activities incident to his immediate office.

ESTABLISHMENT

On September 8, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an order that established the divisions of the Executive Office of the President and defined their functions and duties. The National Archives published Executive Order No. 8248 in the Federal Register (4 FR 3864) 4 days later. The President's order established the White House Office as one of five divisions within the Executive Office. It also defined the Office's duties and functions as "to serve the President in an intimate capacity in the performance of the many detailed activities incident to his immediate office."

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1939-09-12/pdf/FR-1939-09-12.pdf

ACTIVITIES

The President's staff facilitates and maintains communication with the Congress, the heads of executive agencies, the press and other information media, and the general public. The various Assistants to the President aid the President in such matters as he or she may direct.

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that White House Office records have been assigned to record group 130.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/130.html

Career Opportunities

The White House Fellows program offers gifted and highly motivated young Americans firsthand experience with the process of governing the Nation and a sense of personal involvement in the leadership of society.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/fellows | Email: whitehousefellows@who.eop.gov

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID–19)

Guidance on prevention and treatment of COVID–19, as well as updates on the virus and information for specific groups like healthcare professionals and travelers, is available on coronavirus.gov. The website is sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Federal Emergency Management Administration, and the White House.

https://www.coronavirus.gov

Ethics Pledge

A list of waiver certifications for White House Office employees is posted in Portable Document Format (PDF), for viewing and downloading, at the bottom of the "Disclosures" web page, under the heading "Ethics Pledge Waivers."

https://www.whitehouse.gov/disclosures

Federal Register

Documents that the White House Office published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/the-white-house-office

EDITORIAL NOTE:

A dedicated website for the Office of the Vice President is not available.

Office of the Vice President

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20501

202-456-7549
http://www.whitehouse.gov/people/mike-pence/

CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE VICE PRESIDENT Marc Short
Counsel to the Vice President Gregory Jacob
National Security Advisor to the Vice President Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg, Jr., USA (retired)
CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE SECOND LADY OF THE UNITED STATES Jana C. Toner
https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CDIR-2018-10-29/pdf/CDIR-2018-10-29-STATISTICALINFORMATION-13.pdf

ESTABLISHMENT

From the vice-presidency of John Adams in 1789 to that of Richard Nixon in the 1950s, presiding over the Senate was the Vice President's chief function. Each Vice President maintained an office in the Capitol, received staff support and office expenses through the legislative appropriations, and rarely was invited to participate in executive activities, including Cabinet meetings. In 1961, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson moved his chief office from the Capitol to the White House, directed his attention to executive functions, and started attending Senate sessions only at critical times. His actions changed the traditional role of the Vice President and his office, and those changes continue in effect today.

https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/President_Pro_Tempore.htm#1

ACTIVITIES

The Office of the Vice President supports the Vice President's in his or her executive and legislative roles. Within the executive branch of Government, the Vice President holds a position of second in command; within the legislative branch, he or she serves as President of the Senate. The Office's staff develops policy options on a variety of issues, ranging from tax and healthcare policy to foreign policy and national security. Its staff also works with Senators and Representatives to promote the President's legislative priorities in the U.S. Congress.

The Office also handles the Vice President's correspondence, events, scheduling, speechwriting, and travel.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/internships/presidential-departments

Sources of Information

Career Opportunities

The following Offices within the Office of the Vice President offer opportunities for young men and women: Administration, Advance for the Vice President, Communications, Counsel to the Vice President, Intergovernmental Affairs, Scheduling for the Vice President, and the Office of the Second Lady. The Departments of Domestic Policy and of Legislative Affairs also participate in the internship program.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/internships/ | Email: intern_application@who.eop.gov

Ethics Pledge

A list of waiver certifications for Office of the Vice President employees is posted in Portable Document Format (PDF), for viewing and downloading, at the bottom of the "Disclosures" web page, under the heading "Ethics Pledge Waivers."

https://www.whitehouse.gov/disclosures

Council of Economic Advisers

Seventeenth and Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20502

202-456-4779
http://www.whitehouse.gov/cea

CHAIR Tyler B. Goodspeed, Acting
Vice Chair Tyler B. Goodspeed
Member (vacancy)

Chief of Staff Rachael Slobodien
https://www.whitehouse.gov/cea/staff
https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CDIR-2018-10-29/pdf/CDIR-2018-10-29-STATISTICALINFORMATION-13.pdf

The above list of key personnel was updated 7–2020.

The above list of key personnel was updated 7–2020.

The Council of Economic Advisers analyzes and appraises the national economy to make policy recommendations to the President.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On February 20, 1946, President Harry S. Truman signed Public Law 79–304, which is also cited as the Employment Act of 1946. The Act "created in the Executive Office of the President a Council of Economic Advisers" (60 Stat. 24).

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/79th-congress/session-2/c79s2ch33.pdf

On June 1, 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower prepared a reorganization plan and transmitted it to the U.S. Congress on June 1, 1953. Reorganization Plan No. 9 of 1953 became effective 2 months later on August 1st and was published in the Federal Register on August 3d.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1953-08-04/pdf/FR-1953-08-04.pdf

The Council continues to function under the Employment Act of 1946 and Reorganization Plan No. 9 of 1953 (5 U.S.C. app.).

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf142&num=0&edition=prelim

Public Law 112–166, which also is cited as the Presidential Appointment Efficiency and Streamlining Act of 2011, affected the appointment process of Council members. The Council comprises three members: one of whom serves as the Chair and another of whom serves as the Vice Chair. The President appoints the Chair by the advice and with the consent of the Senate. The President designates one of the members as Vice Chair, who acts as the Chair in his or her absence. Each Council member, "as a result of training, experience, and attainments," should be "exceptionally qualified to analyze and interpret economic developments, to appraise programs and activities of the Government . . . and to formulate and recommend national economic policy to promote full employment, production, and purchasing power under free competitive enterprise" (126 Stat. 1287–1288).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-126/pdf/STATUTE-126.pdf

STATUTORY AUTHORITIES

Statutory subject matter affecting the Council of Economic Advisers is codified in "Chapter 21—National Policy on Employment and Productivity" of 15 U.S.C. Section 1023 is dedicated to the Council of Economic Advisers.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title15-section1023&num=0&edition=prelim#sourcecredit

ACTIVITIES

The Council analyzes the national economy and its various sectors; advises the President on economic developments; appraises the economic programs and policies of the Federal Government; recommends policies for economic growth and stability to the President; assists in the preparation of the President's economic reports to the U.S. Congress; and prepares the "Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers."

https://www.whitehouse.gov/cea

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of the Council of Economic Advisers have been assigned to record group 459.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/459.html

Career Opportunities

The Council of Economic Advisers recruits senior economists, staff economists, research economists, and research assistants.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/cea/jobs-internships | Email: recruiting@cea.eop.gov

The Council of Economic Advisers offers full- and part-time internships during the spring and fall. During the summer, it offers only full-time internships. Interns assist Council staff with researching a wide range of macroeconomic, microeconomic, and international issues; with analyzing data; with contributing to policymaking; and with supporting the work of the Council by carrying out administrative assignments.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/CEA-Intern-Position-Description.pdf | Email: CEAInternships@cea.eop.gov

Documents

The Government Publishing Office's govinfo website includes the Council of Economic Advisers in the list of executive branch authors on its "Browse by Government Author" web page.

https://www.govinfo.gov/app/browse/author

News

The White House posts news items on the economy and jobs.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/economy-jobs

The White House posts news items on the budget and spending.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/budget-spending

Research

Documents that reflect research of the Council of Economic Advisers are posted on the White House website. The topics that these documents address range from the opportunity costs of socialism to the growth potential of deregulation.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/cea/research

Council on Environmental Quality

722 Jackson Place NW., Washington, DC 20503

202-395-5750

202-456-6224

202-456-2710
http://www.whitehouse.gov/ceq

CHAIR Mary B. Neumayr
Members (vacancy)
(vacancy)

Chief of Staff Viktoria Z. Seale
Federal Chief Sustainability Officer Charlotte Skidmore
Director of Finance and Administration Angela Matos
General Counsel Viktoria Z. Seale

Associate Directors

Associate Directors
Communications Daniel J. Schneider
Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Theresa Pettigrew
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Oversight Edward A. Boling
Natural Resources Melanie Steele

Senior Advisors

Senior Advisors
to the Chair Stuart Levenbach

Infrastructure Kevin Bowman
Natural Resources Jessica Kramer
https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CEQ-Names-Titles-20200707-1.pdf

The Council on Environmental Quality formulates and recommends national policies and initiatives for improving the environment.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On January 1, 1970, President Richard M. Nixon approved Public Law 91–190, which also is cited as the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. The Act established "a national policy for the environment" and provided "for the establishment of a Council on Environmental Quality" (83 Stat. 852). It created the Council (CEQ) in the Executive Office of the President. The CEQ is composed of three members, whom the President appoints by the advice and with the consent of the Senate. The President designates one of the members to serve as the Chair. Each Council member is required to be "exceptionally well qualified to analyze and interpret environmental trends and information of all kinds . . . to formulate and recommend national policies to promote the improvement of the quality of the environment" (83 Stat. 854).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-83/pdf/STATUTE-83-Pg852.pdf

On April 3, 1970, President Richard M. Nixon approved Public Law 91–224, which also is cited as the Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970. The Act established the Office of Environmental Quality (OEQ) in the Executive Office of the President. The CEQ Chair also serves as the Director of the OEQ. The President also appoints, by the Senate's advice and with its consent, the OEQ's deputy director (84 Stat. 114). The Office provides professional and administrative support for the Council. The CEQ and OEQ are referred to, collectively, as the Council on Environmental Quality.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-84/pdf/STATUTE-84-Pg91.pdf

STATUTORY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Statutory subject matter affecting the Council on Environmental Quality is codified in "Chapter 55—National Environmental Policy" of 42 U.S.C. Sections 4341–4347 are dedicated to the Council on Environmental Quality.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title42/chapter55&edition=prelim

Statutory subject matter affecting the Office of Environmental Quality is codified in "Chapter 56—Environmental Quality Improvement" of 42 U.S.C. Section 4372 is dedicated to the Office of Environmental Quality.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title42/chapter56&edition=prelim

Codified rules and regulations associated with the Council on Environmental Quality have been assigned to chapter V of 40 CFR, parts 1500–1599.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=3332dfb05e2ecdfa883fa40713ac3de3&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title40/40chapterV.tpl

ACTIVITIES

The Council develops policies that bring together the Nation's economic, social, and environmental priorities to improve Federal decisionmaking. As required by NEPA, the CEQ also evaluates, coordinates, and mediates Federal activities. It advises and assists the President on both national and international environmental policy matters. It oversees Federal agency and departmental implementation of NEPA.

The CEQ's Office of Federal Sustainability coordinates policy to promote energy and environmental sustainability across Federal Government operations. The Federal Government manages more than 350,000 buildings, operates more than 600,000 vehicles, and purchases annually more than $500 billion in goods and services.

https://www.sustainability.gov/index.html

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of the CEQ have been assigned to record group 580; however, that group does not have a description associated with it.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/index-numeric/501-to-600.html

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of the organizations in the Executive office of the President have been assigned to record group 429. Within that record group, the records of the Citizens' Advisory Committee on Environmental Quality (CACEQ) are located in subgroup 429.3. The CACEQ was established on May 29, 1969, and its members advised the newly established Environmental Quality Council.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/429.html

Career Opportunities

Information on internships and legal clerkships is available on the CEQ's "Contact" web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ceq/contact | Email: internships@ceq.eop.gov

Contact Information

Contact information for the Office of Federal Sustainability is available on the "Contact Us" page of its website.

https://www.sustainability.gov/contact.html | Email: sustainability@ceq.eop.gov

Environmental Review / Permitting for Infrastructure

President Trump's administration promotes the development of a modern and resilient infrastructure to support the energy, transportation, water, and other sectors of the Nation's economy. The permitting process, however, can be costly, fragmented, inefficient, and unpredictable. To reduce duplication and uncertainty that can delay major projects during the Federal environmental review and authorization process, the President's administration has released actions plans and issued Executive orders, guidance, and memorandums.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ceq/initiatives/infrastructure

Federal Register

Significant documents and documents that the CEQ recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/council-on-environmental-quality

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

The FOIA gives a person a right to request access to Federal agency records or information. An agency must disclose records that any person properly requests in writing. Pursuant to one or more of nine exemptions and three exclusions that the Act contains, a Federal agency may withhold certain records or parts of them. The FOIA applies only to Federal agencies and does not create a right of access to records held by the U.S. Congress, the courts, State or local government agencies, and private entities. The CEQ maintains an online requester service center.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ceq/foia

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

President Trump issued Executive Order 13807, which directed the CEQ to review its current NEPA regulations and to modernize and accelerate the Federal environmental review and decision-making process.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ceq/nepa-modernization

News

The White House posts news items on energy and the environment.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/energy-environment

The White House posts news items on land and agriculture.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/land-agriculture

Ocean Policy

President Trump's administration recognizes that healthy ocean, coastal, and Great Lake waters support the Nation’s economy, global-competitiveness, security, and overall well-being.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ceq/initiatives/ocean-policy

A national strategy to map the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone and a strategy to map the Alaskan coastline are being developed by Federal agencies.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-donald-j-trump-accelerating-ocean-exploration

Open Government

The Open Government initiative promotes the principles of collaboration, participation, and transparency to make the Federal Government more accountable and more effective.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/CEQ-Open-Government-Plan.pdf | Email: FN-CEQ-OpenGov@ceq.eop.gov

Sustainability

The Federal Government is the Nation's largest energy consumer, managing over 350,000 buildings and operating over 600,000 vehicles. By increasing operational efficiency, Federal agencies reduce waste, save taxpayer dollars, lessen harmful effects on ecosystems, and support cleaner air, land, and water. Governmentwide performance data on sustainability goals are available on the website of the Office of Federal Sustainability.

https://www.sustainability.gov/performance.html | Email: sustainability@ceq.eop.gov

National Security Council

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20504

202-456-1414
http://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc

STATUTORY MEMBERS

STATUTORY MEMBERS
CHAIR Donald J. Trump
https://www.whitehouse.gov/people/donald-j-trump
Mark T. Esper
https://www.defense.gov/Our-Story/Meet-the-Team/Secretary-of-Defense
Michael R. Pence
https://www.whitehouse.gov/people/mike-pence
Michael R. Pompeo
https://www.state.gov/secretary

STATUTORY ADVISERS

STATUTORY ADVISERS
John L. Ratcliffe
https://www.dni.gov/index.php/who-we-are/leadership/director-of-national-intelligence?highlight=WyJiaW9ncmFwaGllcyIsImJpb2dyYXBoeSJd
Gen. Mark A. Milley, USA
https://www.jcs.mil/Leadership/Article-View/Article/1974872/gen-mark-a-milley

STANDING PARTICIPANTS

STANDING PARTICIPANTS
Chief of Staff to the President Mark R. Meadows
Counsel to the President Pasquale A. Cipollone
Director of the National Economic Council Lawrence A. Kudlow
National Security Adviser Robert C. O'Brien
Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin
U.S. Representative to the United Nations Kelly K. Craft

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On July 26, 1947, President Harry S. Truman signed Public Law 80–253, which is also cited as the National Security Act of 1947. By enacting this legislation, the U.S. Congress sought "to provide for the establishment of integrated policies and procedures for the departments, agencies, and functions of the Government relating to the national security; to provide three military departments for the operation and administration of the Army, the Navy . . . and the Air Force, with their assigned combat and service components; to provide for their authoritative coordination and unified direction under civilian control but not to merge them; to provide for the effective strategic direction of the armed forces and for their operation under unified control and for their integration into an efficient team of land, naval, and air forces." The law established "a council to be known as the National Security Council" and stipulated that the President should preside over its meetings (61 Stat. 496).

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/80th-congress/session-1/c80s1ch343.pdf

The National Security Council (NSC) was placed in the Executive Office of the President by Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1949 (5 U.S.C. app.).

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf100&num=0&edition=prelim

The statutory members (PL 81–216) of the NSC—in addition to the President, who chairs the Council—are the Vice President and the Secretaries of State and Defense (63 Stat. 579). The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is the statutory military adviser to the NSC, and the Director of National Intelligence serves as its intelligence adviser. The Secretary of the Treasury, the U.S. Representative to the United Nations, the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, and the Chief of Staff to the President are invited to all meetings of the NSC. The Attorney General and the Director of National Drug Control Policy are invited to attend meetings pertaining to their jurisdictions, and other officials are invited, as appropriate.

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/81st-congress/session-1/c81s1ch412.pdf

STATUTORY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Codified content on the National Security Council from Section 101 of the National Security Act of 1947 was formerly located in "Chapter 15—National Security" of 50 U.S.C.and classified editorially as section 402. That content has been subsequently transferred to "Chapter 44—National Security" of 50 U.S.C. and editorially reclassified as section 3021.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title50/chapter44/subchapter1&edition=prelim

NSC rules and regulations are codified in 32 CFR 2100–2199. Within title 32, sections 2100–2199 constitute "Chapter XXI—National Security Council."

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=6df20eda89deafaa9405f41122a78691&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title32/32chapterXXI.tpl

ACTIVITIES

The NSC advises and assists the President, in conjunction with the National Economic Council, with the integration of all aspects of national security policy—domestic, economic, foreign, intelligence, and military—that affects the United States.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that NSC records have been assigned to record group 273.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/273.html

Federal Register

Documents that the NSC published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/national-security-council

News

The White House posts news items on national security and defense.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/national-security-defense

EDITORIAL NOTE:

A dedicated website for the Office of Administration is not available.

Office of Administration

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, 1650 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20503

202-456-2861

DIRECTOR Monica J. Block
https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/July-1-2020-Report-FINAL.pdf

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

The origins of the Office of Administration lie in Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1977, which President James E. Carter prepared and transmitted to the Senate and House of Representatives on July 15 of that same year. The new office was created to "provide components of the Executive Office of the President with such administrative services as the President shall from time to time direct."

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf183&num=0&edition=prelim

On December 12, 1977, President Carter signed Executive Order 12028 and formally established the Office of Administration within the Executive Office of the President. That Executive order was published in the Federal Register on December 14, 1977 (42 FR 62895). Transfers of records, property, personnel, and unexpended balances of appropriations to the Office of Administration became effective on April 1, 1978.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1977-12-14/pdf/FR-1977-12-14.pdf

The activities of the Director are subject to the direction or approval of the President. The Director organizes the Office of Administration, employs its staff, contracts for supplies and services, and carries out other duties that the President, as head of the Office, might do. In his or her capacity as the chief administrative officer of the Office, the Director ensures that it provides units within the Executive Office of the President with common administrative support and services.

ACTIVITIES

The Office of Administration is exclusively dedicated to providing uniform administrative support and services to all units that constitute the Executive Office of the President—except for services that are provided primarily in direct support of the President. The Office does, however, upon request, assist the White House Office with providing administrative services that are primarily in direct support of the President (42 FR 62895).

The common administrative support and services that the Office provides fall within the following general administrative areas: personnel management (e.g., equal employment opportunity programs); financial management; data processing; library, records, and information; and office and operations (e.g., graphics, mail, messenger, printing and duplication, procurement, supply, and word processing); and other support or services that can achieve savings and efficiency through centralization (ibid).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1977-12-14/pdf/FR-1977-12-14.pdf

Sources of Information

Federal Register

Documents that the Office of Administration published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/administration-office-executive-office-of-the-president

Office of Management and Budget

New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503

202-395-3080
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb

DIRECTOR Russell T. Vought
Deputy Director (vacancy)

Deputy Director for Management Michael J. Rigas, Acting
General Counsel Mark R. Paoletta
Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator Vishal J. Amin

ASSISTANT DIRECTORS

ASSISTANT DIRECTORS
Budget Kelly A. Kinneen
Legislative Reference Matthew J. Vaeth
Management and Operations Sarah W. Spooner

HEADS OF STATUTORY OFFICES

HEADS OF STATUTORY OFFICES
ADMINISTRATORS
Electronic Government and Information Technology Suzette K. Kent
Federal Procurement Policy Michael E. Wooten
Information and Regulatory Affairs Paul J. Ray

CONTROLLER
Federal Financial Management (vacancy)

The Office of Management and Budget assists the President in discharging budgetary, management, and other responsibilities; develops, coordinates, oversees, and implements Federal Government policies affecting financial management and procurement, rules and regulations, and information and statistics; and promotes better program and administrative management, develops measures for agency-performance, and improves coordination of operations within the executive branch.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On April 3, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt approved Public Law 76–19, which also is cited as the Reorganization Act of 1939 (53 Stat. 561). Pursuant to the Act, President Roosevelt prepared an appropriate plan of reorganization.

https://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/76th-congress/session-1/c76s1ch36.pdf

Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1939 transferred the Bureau of the Budget and its functions and personnel from the Department of the Treasury to the Executive Office of the President. President Roosevelt submitted the plan to the Senate and House of Representatives on April 25.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf86&num=0&edition=prelim

On July 1, 1939, the National Archives published President Roosevelt's reorganization plan in the Federal Register (4 FR 2727). The Bureau of the Budget was the forerunner of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1939-07-01/pdf/FR-1939-07-01.pdf

Pursuant to the provisions of chapter 9 of 5 U.S.C., President Richard M. Nixon prepared Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1970 and submitted it to the Senate and House of Representatives on March 12. The plan redesignated the Bureau of the Budget as the OMB.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf177&num=0&edition=prelim

On May 23, 1970, the National Archives published the reorganization plan in the Federal Register (35 FR 7959).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1970-05-23/pdf/FR-1970-05-23.pdf

Pursuant to Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1970, President Nixon issued Executive Order 11541 on July 1, 1970. The Executive order prescribed the duties of the newly designated OMB and was published the next day, in the Federal Register (35 FR 10737).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1970-07-02/pdf/FR-1970-07-02.pdf

STATUTORY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Codified statutory material on money and finance has been assigned to 31 U.S.C. Chapter 5, which comprises sections 501–522, of that title is dedicated to statutory material affecting the OMB.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title31/subtitle1/chapter5&edition=prelim

"Subtitle A—Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements," which comprises parts 1–299, has been assigned to 2 CFR.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=76703d9ac3361ee46fdf902194fd8a1f&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title02/2subtitleA.tpl

"Chapter III—Office of Management and Budget," which comprises parts 1300–1399, has been assigned to 5 CFR. That CFR title contains codified rules and regulations whose contents deal with the subject of administrative personnel.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=be579a84626d26223245cc3a9139c7d9&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title05/5chapterIII.tpl

ACTIVITIES

The OMB's principle functions are diverse and many. They include assisting the President with the development of more effective Government and its maintenance by reviewing the organizational structure and management procedures of the executive branch; assisting with the development of efficient coordinating mechanisms for the implementation of Government activities and the expansion of interagency cooperation; assisting the President with preparation of the budget and formulation of the Government's fiscal program; supervising and controlling the administration of the budget; assisting the President with clearing and coordinating departmental advice on proposed legislation and with making recommendations to effect Presidential action on legislative enactments; assisting with the development of regulatory reform proposals and programs for paperwork reduction; assisting with the consideration, clearing, and preparation of proposed Executive orders and proclamations; planning and developing information systems that provide the President with program performance data; planning, conducting, and promoting evaluation efforts that help the President assess program efficiency, performance, and objectives; improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the procurement processes by guiding procurement policies, procedures, regulations, and use of forms; and informing the President of the progress of Government agency activities with respect to proposed, initiated, and completed work, together with the relative timing of work between agencies of the Government—to the end that the work programs of executive branch agencies may be coordinated and that the moneys the U.S. Congress appropriates may be expended with economy, barring overlapping and duplication of effort.

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that OMB records have been assigned to record group 051.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/051.html

Budget / Spending

Executive orders and memoranda, factsheets, statements and releases, and other budget- and spending-related news items are posted on the White House website.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/budget-spending

Career Opportunities

In 2019, the OMB ranked 6th among 28 small Government agencies in the Partnership for Public Service's Best Places To Work Agency Rankings.

https://bestplacestowork.org/rankings/detail/BO00

Chief Financial Officers Council

The Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 (PL 101–576) established the Chief Financial Officers Council. The OMB's deputy director for management serves as the chair of the Council. The General Services Administration and the OMB jointly manage its website.

https://www.cfo.gov/about-the-council

Circulars

The OMB posts information and instructions that it issues to Federal agencies on its "Circulars" web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/information-for-agencies/circulars

Contact

Postal correspondence should be addressed to the Office of Management and Budget, 725 Seventeenth Street NW., Washington, DC 20503. Information and directory assistance are available. Phone, 202-395-3080.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb

Congressional inquiries may be made by phone. Phone, 202-395-4790. Congressional correspondence may be sent by facsimile. Fax, 202-395-3729.

Media inquiries may be made by email, facsimile, or phone. Fax, 202-395-3888. Phone, 202-395-7254.

Email: media@omb.eop.gov

Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency (CIGIE)

The Inspector General Reform Act of 2008 (PL 110–409) established the CIGIE as an independent entity within the executive branch. The OMB's deputy director for management serves as the executive chair of the Council.

https://www.ignet.gov/content/cigie-governing-documents

Economy / Jobs

Executive orders and proclamations, factsheets, remarks, press briefings, statements and releases, and other economic and job-related news items are posted on the White House website.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/economy-jobs

Federal Register

Significant documents and documents that the OMB recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/management-and-budget-office

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

To any person, the FOIA gives a statutory right for obtaining access to Government information in the records of executive branch agencies. This right to access has limits, when any of nine exemptions that are contained within the statute shield the requested information from disclosure. Information on how to submit a FOIA request is available online. The OMB's FOIA Requester Service Center also provides assistance. Phone, 202-395-3642.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/freedom-information-act-foia | Email: OMBFOIA@omb.eop.gov

Many OMB documents are freely available online and do not require a FOIA request for gaining access to them. These documents are called "proactive disclosures" because the OMB proactively posts them online. Documents that are disclosed in the interest of transparency and documents that have been requested frequently under the FOIA are examples of proactive disclosures. Before submitting a FOIA request, an information seeker should browse the holdings of the OMB's electronic FOIA library to see if the desired information has been posted already.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/freedom-information-act-foia/#FOIA_Library

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

The OMB posts answers to FAQs on its Freedom of Information Act web page. The first set of FAQs are about the OMB: What does it do; what offices belong to it; and what types of records does it have?

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/freedom-information-act-foia/#_Frequently_Asked_Questions

The OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs posts answers to FAQs that deal with regulations, rules, and the process of making rules, on the website reginfo.gov.

https://www.reginfo.gov/public/jsp/Utilities/faq.myjsp

Government Performance

The website performance.gov allows the public to monitor Federal agencies' efforts to make Government leaner, smarter, and more effective by cutting waste, streamlining, and improving performance. This site meets the requirements of the GPRA Modernization Act of 2010 (PL 111–352) for an online and centralized performance reporting portal. Performance.gov promotes awareness of the President's management agenda, the Federal performance management framework, and the Federal goal-setting process. The General Services Administration and the OMB jointly manage the website.

https://www.performance.gov

Government Reform and Reorganization

President Trump's administration has posted its plan for reforming Government and its recommendations for reorganizing it. "Delivering Government Solutions in the 21st Century" is available in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/management/government-reform

Intellectual Property

The Office of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator promotes and protects the Nation's innovative economy. The Office posts initiatives, reports, and strategies.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/office-u-s-intellectual-property-enforcement-coordinator-ipec/#new | Email: intellectualproperty@omb.eop.gov

President's Budget

President Trump's budget for Fiscal Year 2021 is available online. Past budgets of former Presidents are also available in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget

Publications

The U.S. Government Bookstore, which the Government Publishing Office maintains on its website, has many publications that deal with Federal deficits, Government budgets, and the Nation's economic outlook.

https://bookstore.gpo.gov/catalog/budget-economy | Email: mainbks@gpo.gov

Sequestration

The OMB posts sequestration reports on whitehouse.gov.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/legislative/sequestration-reports-orders

Office of National Drug Control Policy

Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC 20503

202-395-6700

202-395-6708
http://www.ondcp.gov

DIRECTOR James W. Carroll
Deputy Director (vacancy)

Chief of Staff (vacancy)

COORDINATORS
Demand Reduction (vacancy)
Emerging and Continuing Threats (vacancy)
Interdiction (vacancy)
Performance Budget (vacancy)
State, Local, and Tribal Affairs (vacancy)

General Counsel Michael J. Passante, Acting
https://www.whitehouse.gov/people/jim-carroll
https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title21-section1703&num=0&edition=prelim
https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=b707ffb9d470756b3400b8ce8d9d5865&mc=true&node=pt21.9.1401&rgn=div5#se21.9.1401_12

The Office of National Drug Control Policy helps the President establish his National Drug Control Strategy objectives, priorities, and policies and makes budget, program, and policy recommendations affecting National Drug Control Program agencies.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On November 18, 1988, President Ronald W. Reagan approved Public Law 100–690 "to prevent the manufacturing, distribution, and use of illegal drugs, and for other purposes" (102 Stat. 4181). The 365-page piece of legislation contained a number of shorter acts, including the National Narcotics Leadership Act of 1988, which established the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) in the Executive Office of the President and became effective January 21, 1989 (102 Stat. 4189). At the head of the new Office, the Act placed a Director who is assisted by a Deputy Director for Demand Reduction and a Deputy Director for Supply Reduction. The Act also created a Bureau of State and Local Affairs within the Office (102 Stat. 4181).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-102/pdf/STATUTE-102-Pg4181.pdf

On October 21, 1998, President William J. Clinton approved Public Law 105–277, which made "omnibus consolidated and emergency appropriations" (112 Stat. 2681). The 920-page piece of legislation included the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 1998 (112 Stat. 2681–670). This Act of reauthorization created the new position of Deputy Director of National Drug Control Policy to assist the ONDCP Director (112 Stat. 2681–672).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-112/pdf/STATUTE-112-Pg2681.pdf

On December 29, 2006, President George W. Bush approved Public Law 109–469, which also is cited as the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 2006 (120 Stat. 3502). This Act of reauthorization made amendments to the earlier Act of 1998 and contained the following reporting provision: "The Deputy Director for Demand Reduction, the Deputy Director for Supply Reduction, and the Deputy Director for State, Local, and Tribal Affairs shall report directly to the Deputy Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy" (120 Stat. 3505).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-120/pdf/STATUTE-120-Pg3502.pdf

On October 24, 2018, President Donald J. Trump approved Public Law 115–271, which also is cited as the "SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act" (132 Stat. 3894). This 250-page piece of legislation included the Substance Abuse Prevention Act of 2018 (132 Stat. 4110), which reauthorized the ONDCP, expanded its mandate, and made other changers.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/PLAW-115publ271/pdf/PLAW-115publ271.pdf

The President appoints the ONDCP Director by the advice and with the consent of the Senate. The President also appoints the Deputy Director. Both of these appointees serve at the pleasure of the President.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title21/chapter22&edition=prelim

STATUTORY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Codified statutory material on food and drugs has been assigned to 21 U.S.C. Subchapter I, which comprises sections 1501–1509, of chapter 20 of that title is dedicated to statutory material affecting the ONDCP.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title21/chapter20/subchapter1&edition=prelim

Codified statutory material on food and drugs has been assigned to 21 U.S.C. Chapter 22, which comprises sections 1701–1715, of that title is dedicated to statutory material affecting national drug control policy.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title21/chapter22&edition=prelim

"Chapter III—Office of National Drug Control Policy," which comprises parts 1400–1499, has been assigned to 21 CFR. That CFR title contains codified rules and regulations whose contents deal with the subjects of food and drugs.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=eadabaf406c904d7d3d6cdeb5ae6a7ec&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title21/21chapterIII.tpl

The "Authorizations" web page has links to public laws and Executive orders that have affected the ONDCP.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/about/authorizations

ACTIVITIES

The Director establishes policies, objectives, priorities, and performance measurements for the National Drug Control Program. Each year, the Director promulgates the President's National Drug Control Strategy, other related drug control strategies, supporting reports, and a program budget that the President submits to Congress. The Director advises the President on necessary changes in the organization, management, budgeting, and personnel allocation of Federal agencies that monitor drug activities. The Director also notifies Federal agencies if their policies do not comply with their responsibilities under the National Drug Control Strategy. The ONDCP also has direct programmatic responsibility for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) program and the Drug-Free Communities (DFC) support program.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/the-administrations-approach/the-administrations-strategy

The HIDTA program is a Federal grant program that the ONDCP administers. The program provides resources to Federal, State, local, and Tribal agencies for coordinating activities to address drug production and trafficking in designated areas nationwide.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/the-hidta-program/overview

The DFC support program is a Federal grant program that the ONDCP administers. The program provides grants to community coalitions for strengthening the local infrastructure to reduce drug use among youth and to maintain the reductions that are achieved.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/the-dfc-program/overview

Sources of Information

Advisories

The ONDCP works with other Federal agencies to study drug-related trends and to make appropriate-response recommendations available to the general public and private sector.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/about/advisories

Anti-Doping / Clean Sport

The ONDCP has historically represented the United States at the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and provided funding to WADA and the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. More information and links to the websites of both of these anti-doping agencies are available on the "Anti-Doping and Clean Sport" web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/other-grant-programs/anti-doping-clean-sport/

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of the ONDCP have been assigned to record group 581; however, that group does not have a description associated with it.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/index-numeric/501-to-600.html#page-header

Budget / Performance

The ONDCP posts budget and performance documents on its "Budget, Performance, and Data" web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/about/budget-performance-data

Career Opportunities

The ONDCP posts employment opportunities on USAJobs.gov.

https://www.usajobs.gov

ONDCP hosts an unpaid student internship program. Information about the program, including application instructions and requirements, are posted in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/ONDCP-Unpaid-Student-Internship-Program-1.pdf

Contact

Members of the press may contact the ONDCP by using the email address below.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/about/contact-us | Email: MediaInquiry@ondcp.eop.gov

Drug-Free Communities (DFC)

Application information for DFC grants is available on the ONDCP's "Application Process" web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/the-dfc-program/application-process | Email: DFC@ONDCP.EOP.gov

Federal Register

Significant documents and documents that the ONDCP recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/office-of-national-drug-control-policy

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

To any person, the FOIA gives a statutory right for obtaining access to Government information in the records of executive branch agencies. This right to access has limits, when any of nine exemptions that are contained within the statute shield the requested information from disclosure. Information on how to submit a FOIA request is available online. The ONDCP's FOIA Requester Center also provides assistance. Phone, 202-395-6622. Fax, 202-395-5543.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/about/foia-and-legal | Email: FOIA@ondcp.eop.gov

High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA)

The ONDCP maintains an online HIDTA map in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/June-2020-HIDTA_Designation-Map.pdf

Opioid Crisis

The final report (2017) of the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis is available online in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/the-administrations-approach/presidents-commission-opioids

Overdose Deaths

The ONDCP has posted a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chart that shows the increase in overdose deaths nationwide from 1999 to 2017.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/the-administrations-approach/the-drug-crisis

Strategy

The ONDCP report "National Drug Control Strategy—February 2020" is available online in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/2020-NDCS.pdf

Office of Policy Development

The Office of Policy Development comprises the Domestic Policy and the National Economic Councils, which advise and assist the President in the formulation, coordination, and implementation of domestic and economic policy. The Office of Policy Development also supports other policy development and implementation activities as directed by the President.

EDITORIAL NOTE:

A dedicated website for the Domestic Policy Council is not available.

Domestic Policy Council

Room 469, Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20502

202-456-5594

DOMESTIC POLICY COUNCIL

DOMESTIC POLICY COUNCIL
DIRECTOR Brooke L. Rollins, Acting
https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/July-1-2020-Report-FINAL.pdf

The above list of key personnel was updated 7–2020.

The above list of key personnel was updated 7–2020.

On August 16, 1993, President William J. Clinton signed Executive Order 12859 to establish the Domestic Policy Council (DPC). The DPC oversees development and implementation of the President's domestic policy agenda, and it ensures coordination and communication among the heads of relevant Federal offices and agencies.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/WCPD-1993-08-23/pdf/WCPD-1993-08-23-Pg1638.pdf

EDITORIAL NOTE:

A dedicated website for the National Economic Council is not available.

National Economic Council

Room 235, Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20502

202-456-2800

NATIONAL ECONOMIC COUNCIL

NATIONAL ECONOMIC COUNCIL
DIRECTOR Lawrence A. Kudlow
Deputy Director Francis J. Brooke, Jr.

Chief Economist Joseph A. Lavorgna
Chief of Staff Susan C. Varga
https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/July-1-2020-Report-FINAL.pdf

The above list of key personnel was updated 7–2020.

The above list of key personnel was updated 7–2020.

On January 25, 1993, President William J. Clinton signed Executive Order 12835 to establish the National Economic Council (NEC). The NEC coordinates the economic policymaking process and advises the President on economic policy. The NEC also ensures that economic policy decisions and programs remain consistent with the President's stated goals, and it monitors the implementation of the President's economic goals.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/WCPD-1993-02-01/pdf/WCPD-1993-02-01-Pg95.pdf

Sources of Information

Federal Register

Documents that the NEC has published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/national-economic-council

Office of Science and Technology Policy

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, 1650 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20502

202-456-4444

202-456-6021
http://www.ostp.gov

DIRECTOR John P. Holdren
Chief of Staff Cristin Dorgelo

Assistant Director, Federal Research and Development Kei Koizumi
Assistant Director, Legislative Affairs Donna Pignatelli
Communications Director / Senior Policy Analyst Kristin Lee
Deputy Chief of Staff / Assistant Director Ted M. Wackler
General Counsel Rachael Leonard

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER
Chief Technology Officer Megan Smith
Deputy Chief Technology Officer Alexander Macgillivray
Deputy Chief Technology Officer Corinna Zarek
Deputy Chief Technology Officer Edward W. Felten
Deputy Chief Technology Officer, Data Policy / Chief Data Scientist Dhanuray Patil

ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY DIVISION
Associate Director (vacancy)
Assistant Director, Clean Energy and Transportation Austin Brown
Assistant Director, Climate Adaptation and Ecosystems Laura Petes
Assistant Director, Climate Resilience and Information Amy Luers
Assistant Director, Climate Resilience and Land Use Rich Pouyat
Assistant Director, Climate Science Donald Wuebbles
Assistant Director, Earth Observations David Hermreck
Assistant Director, Environmental Health Bruce Rodan
Assistant Director, Natural Disaster Resilience Jacqueline Meszaros
Assistant Director, Polar Sciences Martin Jeffries
Assistant Director, Space Weather William Murtagh
Principal Assistant Director, Environment and Energy Tamara Dickinson

NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DIVISION
Associate Director (vacancy)
Assistant Director, Biosecurity and Emerging Technologies Gerald Epstein
Assistant Director, Cybersecurity Timothy Polk
Assistant Director, Cybersecurity Strategy Gregory Shannon
Assistant Director, Defense Programs Chris Fall
Assistant Director, Global Security Matthew J. Heavner
Assistant Director, Special Programs Mark LeBlanc
Principal Assistant Director, National Security and International Affairs Steve Fetter

SCIENCE DIVISION
Associate Director Jo Emily Handelsman
Assistant Director, Bioethics and Privacy Melissa Goldstein
Assistant Director, Broadening Participation Wanda Ward
Assistant Director, Education and Learning Science Danielle Carnival
Assistant Director, Education and Physical Sciences Meredith Drosback
Assistant Director, Research Infrastructure Altaf Carim
Assistant Director, Scientific Data and Information Jerry Sheehan

TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION DIVISION
Associate Director (vacancy)
Assistant Director, Behavioral Science Maya Shankar
Assistant Director, Biological Innovation Robbie Barbero
Assistant Director, Civil and Commercial Space Benjamin Roberts
Assistant Director, Education and Telecommunications Innovation Aadil Ginwala
Assistant Director, Entrepreneurship Douglas Rand
Assistant Director, Innovation for Growth Jennifer Erickson
Assistant Director, Learning and Innovation Kumar Garg
Assistant Director, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Lloyd Whitman
Assistant Director, Open Innovation Christofer Nelson
Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation Thomas Kalil

BUDGET AND ADMINISTRATION
Operations Manager and Security Officer Stacy Murphy

COUNCILS

COUNCILS
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL OF ADVISORS ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Executive Director Ashley Predith

NATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL
Executive Director Afua Bruce
Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office Michael Meador
Director, Networking and Information Technology Research and Development National Coordination Office Bryan Biegel
Director, U.S. Global Change Research Program National Coordination Office Michael Kuperberg
Director, U.S. Group on Earth Observation Program Timothy Stryker

The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) was established within the Executive Office of the President by the National Science and Technology Policy, Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 (42 U.S.C. 6611).

The Office supports the President by serving as a source of engineering, scientific, and technological analysis and judgment on plans, policies, and programs of the Federal Government. OSTP experts advise the President on scientific and technological matters that affect areas of national concern like the economy, environment, foreign relations, health, and national security; evaluate the effectiveness, quality, and scale of the Federal effort in science and technology; advise and assist the President, the Office of Management and Budget, and Federal agencies throughout the Federal budget development process; and help the President with leading and coordinating the Federal Government's research and development programs.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about

Sources of Information

Blog

The OSTP's Web site features a blog.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/blog

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Instructions for submitting a FOIA request are available online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/library/foia

Internships

Internships offer a unique opportunity to work with senior White House officials and science and technology policy analysts in the OSTP's topic-based divisions or on the OSTP legal team. Applicants may apply for one of three terms: Fall, Spring, or Summer. Each term lasts no more than 90 days; interns receive no remuneration; and students may be eligible to receive academic credit.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about/student

Library

The OSTP's resource library is an expanding collection of agency materials that includes compliance guidelines, documents, presentations, reports, speeches, and testimonies. An archival section contains materials from past administrations.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/library

Press Room

White House factsheets and science and technology-related remarks, statements, weekly addresses, and other Presidential items are available on the OSTP's Web site.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/pressroom
https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/contactus

Office of the United States Trade Representative

600 Seventeenth Street NW., Washington, DC 20508

202-395-3230
http://www.ustr.gov

UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Robert E. Lighthizer
Deputy U.S. Trade Representative–Geneva (vacancy)
Deputy U.S. Trade Representative–Washington (vacancy)
Deputy U.S. Trade Representative–Washington (vacancy)

Chief Agricultural Negotiator (vacancy)
Chief of Staff Jamieson L. Greer
Director, Interagency Center on Trade Implementation, Monitoring and Enforcement (vacancy)
General Counsel Stephen Vaughn

ASSISTANT U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVES

ASSISTANT U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVES
Administration Fed Ames
African Affairs (vacancy)
Agricultural Affairs Sharon Bomer Lauritsen
South and Central Asian Affairs Mark Linscott
China Affairs Terrence J. McCartin, Acting
Congressional Affairs Christopher Jackson
Environment and Natural Resources Jennifer Prescott
Europe and Middle East Affairs L. Daniel Mullaney
Innovation and Intellectual Property (vacancy)
Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Engagement (vacancy)
Japan, Korea, and Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Affairs Michael Beeman
Labor Lewis Karesh
Monitoring and Enforcement Juan Millan
Private Sector Engagement (vacancy)
Public and Media Affairs (vacancy)
Services and Investment Daniel Bahar
Small Business, Market Access and Industrial Competitiveness James Sanford
Southeast Asia and Pacific Affairs Barbara Weisel
Textiles William Jackson
Trade Policy and Economic Affairs Edward Gresser
Western Hemisphere John Melle
World Trade Organization (WTO) and Multilateral Affairs Dawn Shackleford

The United States Trade Representative formulates trade policy for and directs all trade negotiations of the United States.

Organizational Chart

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative was created as the Office of the Special Representative for Trade Negotiations by Executive Order 11075 of January 15, 1963. The Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2171) established the Office as an agency of the Executive Office of the President charged with administering the trade agreements program.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/history

The Office sets and administers overall trade policy. The U.S. Trade Representative heads the Office and serves as the President's principal adviser, negotiator, and spokesperson on international trade and investment issues. The Representative acts as the chief representative of the United States in all General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade activities; in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development discussions, meetings, and negotiations that deal primarily with commodity issues and trade; in U.N. Conference on Trade and Development negotiations and other multilateral institution negotiations that deal primarily with commodity issues and trade; in other bilateral and multilateral negotiations that deal primarily with commodities or trade, including East-West trade; in negotiations under sections 704 and 734 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1671c and 1673c); and in negotiations on direct investment incentives and disincentives and on bilateral investment issues concerning barriers to investment.

The Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 codified these authorities and added additional authority, including the implementation of section 301 actions that enforce U.S. rights under international trade agreements.

The U.S. Trade Representative serves as a Cabinet-level official with the rank of Ambassador and reports directly to the President. The Chief Agricultural Negotiator and three Deputy U.S. Trade Representatives also hold the rank of Ambassador—two of the deputies are located in Washington, DC, and the other serves in Geneva, Switzerland.

The U.S. Trade Representative is also an ex officio member on the boards of directors of the Export-Import Bank and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. The Representative also serves on the National Advisory Council on International Monetary and Financial Policy.

https://ustr.gov/about-us

Sources of Information

Blog

"Tradewinds" is the official blog of the U.S. Trade Representative.

https://ustr.gov/tradewinds

Factsheets

The U.S. Trade Representative releases factsheets on trade issues.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/fact-sheets

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Requests must be made in writing: Freedom of Information Officer, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, 1724 F Street NW., Washington, DC 20508. Security procedures can slow down mail receipt and processing. Sending a request by email or fax avoids security-related delays. To facilitate finding the desired information, a record description must contain key details—author, date, recipient, subject matter, title or name. The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative operates a FOIA requestor service center. Phone, 202-395-3419. Fax, 202-395-9458.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/reading-room/freedom-information-act-foia | Email: FOIA@ustr.eop.gov

The electronic reading room contains information that is made available on a routine basis to the public. It also features documents that are frequently requested under the FOIA. This collection of online documents continues to grow as records in which the public expresses an interest are added.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/reading-room/freedom-information-act-foia/electronic-reading-room

History

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy created a new Office of the Special Trade Representative in the Executive Office of the President and designated two new Deputies, one in the Nation's capital and the other in Geneva, Switzerland. The rest of the story is available on the Web site of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/history

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative posted "Facts About Trade" to commemorate its 50th anniversary.

https://ustr.gov/50/facts

Key Issues

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative focuses it's trade policy on 14 issue areas: agriculture, economy and trade, enforcement, environment, government procurement, industry and manufacturing, intellectual property, labor, preference programs, services and investment, small business, textiles and apparel, trade and development, and trade organizations.

https://ustr.gov/issue-areas

Map

The United States has trade relations with more than 75 countries worldwide.

https://ustr.gov/countries-regions

North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

The Web site of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative features facts on the NAFTA.

https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/north-american-free-trade-agreement-nafta

Open Government

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative supports the Open Government initiative by promoting the principles of collaboration, participation, and transparency.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/open/around/eop/ustr

Press Releases

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative posts press releases on its Web site.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/press-releases

Reports / Publications

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative posts reports and publications on its Web site.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/reports-and-publications

Social Media

The U.S. Trade Representative tweets announcements and other newsworthy items on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/USTradeRep

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has a Facebook account.

https://www.facebook.com/USTradeRep

Speeches / Transcripts

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative posts transcriptions of public remarks made by its senior staff.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/speeches

Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T–TIP)

The Web site of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative features a T–TIP issue-by-issue information center.

https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/transatlantic-trade-and-investment-partnership-t-tip/t-tip

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

The Office of the U.S Trade Representative has answered frequently asked questions regarding the TPP on its Web site.

https://ustr.gov/tpp/#facts
https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office

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