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The Executive Office of the President

Under authority of the Reorganization Act of 1939 (5 U.S.C. 133-133r, 133t note), various agencies were transferred to the Executive Office of the President by the President's Reorganization Plans I and II of 1939 (5 U.S.C. app.), effective July 1, 1939. Executive Order 8248 of September 8, 1939, established the divisions of the Executive Office and defined their functions. Subsequently, Presidents have used Executive orders, reorganization plans, and legislative initiatives to reorganize the Executive Office to make its composition compatible with the goals of their administrations.

White House Office

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20500

202-456-1414
http://www.whitehouse.gov

ASSISTANTS TO THE PRESIDENT

ASSISTANTS TO THE PRESIDENT
CHIEF OF STAFF Gen. John F. Kelly, USMC (retired)
Chief of Staff to the First Lady Lindsay Reynolds
Counsel to the President Donald F. McGahn II
Deputy Chief of Staff for Implementation Rick Dearborn
Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations Joe Hagin
Deputy National Security Adviser Maj. Gen. Ricky Waddell, USA (retired)
Director of the White House Military Office (vacancy)
Director of Communications Hope C. Hicks
Director of Presidential Personnel John DeStefano
Director of Scheduling and Advance (vacancy)
National Security Adviser Lt. General H.R. McMasters, USA
Press Secretary Sarah H. Sanders


Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Thomas Bossert

Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway

SENIOR ADVISORS

SENIOR ADVISORS
Assistant to the President for Climate, Conservation and Energy Policy Brian C. Deese
Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Engagement Valerie B. Jarrett
Assistant to the President for Strategy and Communications Shailagh Murray

The White House Office serves the President in the performance of the many detailed activities incident to his immediate office.

The President's staff facilitates and maintains communication with the Congress, the heads of executive agencies, the press and other information media, and the general public. The various Assistants to the President aid the President in such matters as he may direct.

Office of the Vice President

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20501

202-456-7549
https://https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/vice-president-biden

CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE VICE PRESIDENT Nick Ayers
Chief of Staff to Karen Pence Kristan King Nevins

Special Assistant to the Vice President Zach Bauer
Counsel / Assistant to the Vice President Mark Paoletta
Deputy Chief of Staff to Karen Pence / Special Assistant to the President Anthony Bernal

DIRECTORS
Administration / Deputy Assistant to the Vice President Mike Boisvenue
Advance / Deputy Assistant to the Vice President Robert Peede
Communications Jared Agen
Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs / Special Assistant to the President Andeliz Castillo
Legislative Affairs / Assistant to the Vice President Jonathan Hilar
Scheduling / Deputy Assistant to the Vice President Megan Patenaude
Speechwriting / Special Assistant to the President Stephen Ford

National Security Advisor Andrea Thompson

The Office of the Vice President serves the Vice President in the performance of the many activities incident to his immediate office.

Council of Economic Advisers

Seventeenth and Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20502

202-456-4779
http://www.whitehouse.gov/cea

CHAIRMAN Kevin A. Hassett

Member Tomas J. Philipson
Member Richard V. Burkhauser

The Council of Economic Advisers analyzes and appraises the national economy to make policy recommendations to the President.

The Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) was established in the Executive Office of the President by the Employment Act of 1946 (15 U.S.C. 1023). It now functions under that statute and Reorganization Plan No. 9 of 1953 (5 U.S.C. app.), effective August 1, 1953.

The Chair and the two members govern the Council. The President appoints the Chair, whom the Senate must confirm, and the two members.

The Council analyzes the national economy and its various segments; advises the President on economic developments; appraises the economic programs and policies of the Federal Government; recommends policies for economic growth and stability to the President; assists in the preparation of the President's economic reports to the Congress; and prepares the Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers.

Sources of Information

Career Opportunities

To learn about career opportunities, visit the "Jobs and Internships" Web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cea/jobs

History

Photographs and brief professional bios of former Council Chairs, beginning with Edwin G. Nourse, who served as the Chair from 1946 to 1949, are available online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cea/about/former-chairs

Brief professional bios of former Council members, beginning with John D. Clark, who served as a member from 1946 to 1950 and then as the Vice Chair, are available online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cea/about/Former-Members

Publications

Reports and briefs are available in Portable Document Format (PDF) on the Council's Web site.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cea/factsheets-reports

A monthly publication prepared by the Council for the Joint Economic Committee, "Economic Indicators" provides Congress and the public with information on business activity; credit, money, and prices; Federal finance; gross domestic product; employment, income, and production; international statistics; and security markets.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cea/economic-indicators

A yearly report written by the Council's Chair, the "Economic Report of the President" presents the administration's domestic and international economic policies. The report surveys the Nation's economic progress with text and data appendices. The full report and individual chapters are accessible in Portable Document Format (PDF) for download on the Council's Web site. Statistical tables are also available for download in Portable Document and Excel formats.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cea/economic-report-of-the-President

Speeches / Testimony

The Council posts Op-Ed pieces, prepared testimonies for congressional hearings, and speeches on its Web site.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cea/speeches-testimony
http://www.whitehouse.gov/cea

Council on Environmental Quality

722 Jackson Place NW., Washington, DC 20503

202-395-5750

202-456-6224

202-456-2710
http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq

CHAIR (vacancy)
Chief of Staff Christopher Adamo

ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS
Climate Preparedness Jainey Bavishi
Communications Noreen Nielson
Conservation and Wildlife Timothy Male
Energy and Climate Change Richard Duke
Lands and Water Ecosystems Michael Degnan
Legislative Affairs Stephenne Harding
NEPA Oversight Edward Boling
Ocean and Coastal Policy Whitley Saumweber

Deputy Associate Director, Public Engagement and Communications Mark Antoniewicz
General Counsel Brenda Mallory
Managing Director Christina Goldfuss

The Council on Environmental Quality formulates and recommends national policies and initiatives for improving the environment.

The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) was established within the Executive Office of the President by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). The Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 (42 U.S.C. 4371 et seq.) established the Office of Environmental Quality (OEQ) to provide professional and administrative support for the Council. The CEQ and OEQ are referred to, collectively, as the Council on Environmental Quality. The CEQ Chair, whom the President appoints and the Senate confirms, serves as Director of the OEQ.

The Council develops policies that bring together the Nation's economic, social, and environmental priorities to improve Federal decisionmaking. As required by NEPA, the CEQ also evaluates, coordinates, and mediates Federal activities. It advises and assists the President on both national and international environmental policy matters. It oversees Federal agency and departmental implementation of NEPA.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq/initiatives

Sources of Information

Blog

The CEQ Web site features a blog.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq/blog

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Requests may be submitted by email (without an attachment) or fax or sent by postal mail to the Freedom of Information Officer, Council on Environmental Quality, 722 Jackson Place NW., Washington, DC 20503. Fax, 202-456-0753.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq/foia | Email: efoia@ceq.eop.gov

Internships

Most interns work a semester-based schedule (May–August, September–December, or January–April). A position may be customized, however, to accommodate applicant availability and project needs. Application deadlines are February 1 for the summer, June 13 for the fall, and October 1 for the spring.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq/internships | Email: internships@ceq.eop.gov

Open Government

The CEQ supports the Open Government initiative by promoting the principles of collaboration, participation, and transparency.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq/open

Participation

The CEQ maintains a social media presence on Twitter and Facebook. An online subscription form is available to sign up for email updates from the CEQ and opportunities to get involved.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq/stay-connected

Press Releases

The CEQ posts announcements, factsheets, memoranda, statements, and other newsworthy items on its Web site.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq/press_releases
http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq

National Security Council

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20504

202-456-1414
http://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc

MEMBERS

MEMBERS
THE PRESIDENT Donald J. Trump
The Vice President Michael R. Pence
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
Secretary of Defense Gen. James Mattis, USMC (retired)

STATUTORY ADVISERS

STATUTORY ADVISERS
Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats
Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr., USMC

STANDING PARTICIPANTS

STANDING PARTICIPANTS
Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin
Chief of Staff to the President Gen. John Kelly, USMC (retired)
Counsel to the President Donald F. McGahn, II
National Security Adviser Lt. Gen. H.R. McMasters, USA (retired)
Director of the National Economic Council Gary D. Cohn

OFFICIALS

OFFICIALS
National Security Adviser Lt. Gen. H.R. McMasters, USA (retired)
Deputy National Security Adviser Maj. Gen. Ricky Waddell, USA (retired)

The National Security Council was established by the National Security Act of 1947, as amended (50 U.S.C. 402). The Council was placed in the Executive Office of the President by Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1949 (5 U.S.C. app.).

The President chairs the National Security Council. Its statutory members, in addition to the President, are the Vice President and the Secretaries of State and Defense. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is the statutory military adviser to the Council, and the Director of National Intelligence serves as its intelligence adviser. The Secretary of the Treasury, the U.S. Representative to the United Nations, the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, and the Chief of Staff to the President are invited to all meetings of the Council. The Attorney General and the Director of National Drug Control Policy are invited to attend meetings pertaining to their jurisdictions, and other officials are invited, as appropriate.

The Council advises and assists the President in integrating all aspects of national security policy as it affects the United States—domestic, foreign, military, intelligence, and economic—in conjunction with the National Economic Council.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc

Office of Administration

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, 1650 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20503

202-456-2861
http://www.whitehouse.gov/oa

DIRECTOR / DEPUTY ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT (vacancy)
Chief Administrative Officer (vacancy)

Chief Financial Officer Faisal Amin
Chief Logistics Officer Stephen E. Pearson, Acting
General Counsel Hugh L. Brady

The Office of Administration was formally established within the Executive Office of the President by Executive Order 12028 of December 12, 1977.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/oa/history

The Office is exclusively dedicated to assisting the President in providing uniform administrative support services to all units within the Executive Office of the President. The services provided include facilities, information, personnel, technology, and financial management; digital solutions, library, and research services; security; legislative liaisons; and general office operations such as mail, messenger, printing, procurement, and supply services.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/oa

Sources of Information

Career Opportunities

The Office of Administration relies on professionals who come from diverse backgrounds and posses a rare blend of education, experience, and skill. The Office announces job vacancies on USAJobs.gov.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/oa/jobs

Photo Gallery

The Office of Administration contributes to the architectural and historic preservation of the properties associated with the Executive Office of the President. Images of current and past preservation projects are available online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/oa/preservation/projects
http://www.whitehouse.gov/oa

Office of Management and Budget

New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503

202-395-3080
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb

DIRECTOR Mick Mulvaney
Deputy Director Thomas M. Reilly, Acting

Controller, Office of Federal Financial Management (vacancy)
Deputy Director, Management Dustin S. Brown, Acting
Executive Associate Director (vacancy)
General Counsel (vacancy)
Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (vacancy)

ADMINISTRATORS
Office of Federal Procurement Policy (vacancy)
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs Dominic J. Mancini, Acting

DIRECTORS

DIRECTORS
ASSISTANT DIRECTORS
Budget Kelly A. Kinneen, Acting
Legislative Reference Matthew J. Vaeth
Management and Operations Sarah W. Spooner

ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS
Communications John S. Czwartacki
Economic Policy (vacancy)
Education, Income Maintenance and Labor John W. Gray
General Government Programs Kathleen L. Kraninger
Health Joseph L. Grogan
Information Technology and E–Government (vacancy)
Legislative Affairs Jonathan A. Slemrod
National Security Programs Robert B. Blair
Natural Resource Programs James P. Herz
Performance Management (vacancy)

The Office of Management and Budget evaluates, formulates, and coordinates management procedures and program objectives within and among Federal departments and agencies. It also controls the administration of the Federal budget, while routinely providing the President with recommendations regarding budget proposals and relevant legislative enactments.

Organizational Chart

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB), formerly the Bureau of the Budget, was established in the Executive Office of the President pursuant to Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1939 (5 U.S.C. app.).

The Office's primary functions are diverse and many: to assist the President in developing and maintaining effective government by reviewing the organizational structure and management procedures of the executive branch to ensure that the intended results are achieved; to assist in developing efficient coordinating mechanisms to implement Government activities and to expand interagency cooperation; to assist the President in preparing the budget and in formulating the Government's fiscal program; to supervise and control the administration of the budget; to assist the President by clearing and coordinating departmental advice on proposed legislation and by making recommendations effecting Presidential action on legislative enactments, in accordance with past practice; to assist in developing regulatory reform proposals and programs for paperwork reduction, especially reporting burdens of the public; to assist in considering, clearing, and, where necessary, preparing proposed Executive orders and proclamations; to plan and develop information systems that provide the President with program performance data; to plan, conduct, and promote evaluation efforts that assist the President in assessing program objectives, performance, and efficiency; to keep the President informed of the progress of activities by Government agencies with respect to work proposed, initiated, and completed, together with the relative timing of work between the several agencies of the Government, all to the end that the work programs of the several agencies of the executive branch of the Government may be coordinated and that the moneys appropriated by the Congress may be expended in the most economical manner, barring overlapping and duplication of effort; and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the procurement processes by providing overall direction of procurement policies, regulations, procedures, and forms.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/organization_mission

Sources of Information

Career Opportunities

The "Join OMB" Web page has links to learn more about career and detail opportunities, student internships, and applying for OMB positions. Questions may be addressed to the Human Resources Division, Office of Administration, Washington, DC 20500. Phone, 202-395-1088.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/recruitment_default

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Information on how to submit a FOIA request is available online. The OMB's FOIA Request Service Center also provides assistance. Phone, 202-395-3642.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/foia_default#reading | Email: OMBFOIA@omb.eop.gov

Publications

A copy of the "Budget of the United States Government" may be downloaded from the OMB Web site or purchased from the Government Publishing Office bookstore. Phone, 202-512-0132.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/Overview
https://bookstore.gpo.gov/catalog/budget-economy | Email: mainbks@gpo.gov
https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/contact

Office of National Drug Control Policy

Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC 20503

202-395-6700

202-395-6708
http://www.ondcp.gov

DIRECTOR Richard J. Baum, Acting
Chief of Staff Lawrence L. Muir, Acting

Deputy Director, Office of Policy, Research and Budget (vacancy)
General Counsel Lawrence L. Muir

ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS
Office of Intelligence Gerard K. Burns
Office of Intergovernmental Public Liaison (vacancy)
Office of Legislative Affairs (vacancy)
Office of Management and Administration Michele C. Marx
Office of Public Affairs (vacancy)
Office of Research / Data Analysis (vacancy)

The Office of National Drug Control Policy helps the President establish his National Drug Control Strategy objectives, priorities, and policies and makes budget, program, and policy recommendations affecting National Drug Control Program agencies.

The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) was established by the National Narcotics Leadership Act of 1988 (21 U.S.C. 1501 et seq.), effective January 29, 1989, reauthorized through the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 1988 (21 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.), and again reauthorized through the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 2006 (21 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.).

The President appoints the Director of National Drug Control Policy with the advice and consent of the Senate.

The Director establishes policies, objectives, priorities, and performance measurements for the National Drug Control Program. Each year, the Director promulgates the President's National Drug Control Strategy, other related drug control strategies, supporting reports, and a program budget that the President submits to Congress. The Director advises the President on necessary changes in the organization, management, budgeting, and personnel allocation of Federal agencies that monitor drug activities. The Director also notifies Federal agencies if their policies do not comply with their responsibilities under the National Drug Control Strategy. The ONDCP also has direct programmatic responsibility for the Drug-Free Communities Support and the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas programs.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/office-descriptions

Sources of Information

Career Opportunities

Contact the Personnel Section, Office of National Drug Control Policy. Phone, 202-395-6695. Information on student opportunities is available on the "Working at ONDCP" Web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/working-at-ondcp

Publications

To receive publications on drugs and crime control policies, to access specific drug-related data, to access customized bibliographic searches, and to learn more about data availability and other resources, visit the ONDCP Web site.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/news-releases
http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp

Office of Policy Development

The Office of Policy Development comprises the Domestic Policy and the National Economic Councils, which advise and assist the President in the formulation, coordination, and implementation of domestic and economic policy. The Office of Policy Development also supports other policy development and implementation activities as directed by the President.

Domestic Policy Council

Room 469, Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20502

202-456-5594
https://https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/dpc

DOMESTIC POLICY COUNCIL

DOMESTIC POLICY COUNCIL
DIRECTOR / DOMESTIC POLICY ADVISOR TO THE PRESIDENT Andrew P. Bremberg

The above list of key personnel was updated 10–2018.

The above list of key personnel was updated 10–2018.

The Domestic Policy Council was established August 16, 1993, by Executive Order 12859. The Council oversees development and implementation of the President's domestic policy agenda and ensures coordination and communication among the heads of relevant Federal offices and agencies.

National Economic Council

Room 235, Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20502

202-456-2800
https://https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/nec

NATIONAL ECONOMIC COUNCIL

NATIONAL ECONOMIC COUNCIL
DIRECTOR / ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR ECONOMIC POLICY Lawrence A. Kudlow

The above list of key personnel was updated 10–2018.

The above list of key personnel was updated 10–2018.

The National Economic Council was created January 25, 1993, by Executive Order 12835, to coordinate the economic policymaking process and advise the President on economic policy. The Council also ensures that economic policy decisions and programs remain consistent with the President's stated goals and monitors the implementation of the President's economic goals.

Office of Science and Technology Policy

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, 1650 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20502

202-456-4444

202-456-6021
http://www.ostp.gov

DIRECTOR John P. Holdren
Chief of Staff Cristin Dorgelo

Assistant Director, Federal Research and Development Kei Koizumi
Assistant Director, Legislative Affairs Donna Pignatelli
Communications Director / Senior Policy Analyst Kristin Lee
Deputy Chief of Staff / Assistant Director Ted M. Wackler
General Counsel Rachael Leonard

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER
Chief Technology Officer Megan Smith
Deputy Chief Technology Officer Alexander Macgillivray
Deputy Chief Technology Officer Corinna Zarek
Deputy Chief Technology Officer Edward W. Felten
Deputy Chief Technology Officer, Data Policy / Chief Data Scientist Dhanuray Patil

ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY DIVISION
Associate Director (vacancy)
Assistant Director, Clean Energy and Transportation Austin Brown
Assistant Director, Climate Adaptation and Ecosystems Laura Petes
Assistant Director, Climate Resilience and Information Amy Luers
Assistant Director, Climate Resilience and Land Use Rich Pouyat
Assistant Director, Climate Science Donald Wuebbles
Assistant Director, Earth Observations David Hermreck
Assistant Director, Environmental Health Bruce Rodan
Assistant Director, Natural Disaster Resilience Jacqueline Meszaros
Assistant Director, Polar Sciences Martin Jeffries
Assistant Director, Space Weather William Murtagh
Principal Assistant Director, Environment and Energy Tamara Dickinson

NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DIVISION
Associate Director (vacancy)
Assistant Director, Biosecurity and Emerging Technologies Gerald Epstein
Assistant Director, Cybersecurity Timothy Polk
Assistant Director, Cybersecurity Strategy Gregory Shannon
Assistant Director, Defense Programs Chris Fall
Assistant Director, Global Security Matthew J. Heavner
Assistant Director, Special Programs Mark LeBlanc
Principal Assistant Director, National Security and International Affairs Steve Fetter

SCIENCE DIVISION
Associate Director Jo Emily Handelsman
Assistant Director, Bioethics and Privacy Melissa Goldstein
Assistant Director, Broadening Participation Wanda Ward
Assistant Director, Education and Learning Science Danielle Carnival
Assistant Director, Education and Physical Sciences Meredith Drosback
Assistant Director, Research Infrastructure Altaf Carim
Assistant Director, Scientific Data and Information Jerry Sheehan

TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION DIVISION
Associate Director (vacancy)
Assistant Director, Behavioral Science Maya Shankar
Assistant Director, Biological Innovation Robbie Barbero
Assistant Director, Civil and Commercial Space Benjamin Roberts
Assistant Director, Education and Telecommunications Innovation Aadil Ginwala
Assistant Director, Entrepreneurship Douglas Rand
Assistant Director, Innovation for Growth Jennifer Erickson
Assistant Director, Learning and Innovation Kumar Garg
Assistant Director, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Lloyd Whitman
Assistant Director, Open Innovation Christofer Nelson
Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation Thomas Kalil

BUDGET AND ADMINISTRATION
Operations Manager and Security Officer Stacy Murphy

COUNCILS

COUNCILS
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL OF ADVISORS ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Executive Director Ashley Predith

NATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL
Executive Director Afua Bruce
Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office Michael Meador
Director, Networking and Information Technology Research and Development National Coordination Office Bryan Biegel
Director, U.S. Global Change Research Program National Coordination Office Michael Kuperberg
Director, U.S. Group on Earth Observation Program Timothy Stryker

The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) was established within the Executive Office of the President by the National Science and Technology Policy, Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 (42 U.S.C. 6611).

The Office supports the President by serving as a source of engineering, scientific, and technological analysis and judgment on plans, policies, and programs of the Federal Government. OSTP experts advise the President on scientific and technological matters that affect areas of national concern like the economy, environment, foreign relations, health, and national security; evaluate the effectiveness, quality, and scale of the Federal effort in science and technology; advise and assist the President, the Office of Management and Budget, and Federal agencies throughout the Federal budget development process; and help the President with leading and coordinating the Federal Government's research and development programs.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about

Sources of Information

Blog

The OSTP's Web site features a blog.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/blog

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Instructions for submitting a FOIA request are available online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/library/foia

Internships

Internships offer a unique opportunity to work with senior White House officials and science and technology policy analysts in the OSTP's topic-based divisions or on the OSTP legal team. Applicants may apply for one of three terms: Fall, Spring, or Summer. Each term lasts no more than 90 days; interns receive no remuneration; and students may be eligible to receive academic credit.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about/student

Library

The OSTP's resource library is an expanding collection of agency materials that includes compliance guidelines, documents, presentations, reports, speeches, and testimonies. An archival section contains materials from past administrations.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/library

Press Room

White House factsheets and science and technology-related remarks, statements, weekly addresses, and other Presidential items are available on the OSTP's Web site.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/pressroom
https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/contactus

Office of the United States Trade Representative

600 Seventeenth Street NW., Washington, DC 20508

202-395-3230
http://www.ustr.gov

UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Robert E. Lighthizer
Deputy U.S. Trade Representative–Geneva (vacancy)
Deputy U.S. Trade Representative–Washington (vacancy)
Deputy U.S. Trade Representative–Washington (vacancy)

Chief Agricultural Negotiator (vacancy)
Chief of Staff Jamieson L. Greer
Director, Interagency Center on Trade Implementation, Monitoring and Enforcement (vacancy)
General Counsel Stephen Vaughn

ASSISTANT U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVES

ASSISTANT U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVES
Administration Fed Ames
African Affairs (vacancy)
Agricultural Affairs Sharon Bomer Lauritsen
South and Central Asian Affairs Mark Linscott
China Affairs Terrence J. McCartin, Acting
Congressional Affairs Christopher Jackson
Environment and Natural Resources Jennifer Prescott
Europe and Middle East Affairs L. Daniel Mullaney
Innovation and Intellectual Property (vacancy)
Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Engagement (vacancy)
Japan, Korea, and Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Affairs Michael Beeman
Labor Lewis Karesh
Monitoring and Enforcement Juan Millan
Private Sector Engagement (vacancy)
Public and Media Affairs (vacancy)
Services and Investment Daniel Bahar
Small Business, Market Access and Industrial Competitiveness James Sanford
Southeast Asia and Pacific Affairs Barbara Weisel
Textiles William Jackson
Trade Policy and Economic Affairs Edward Gresser
Western Hemisphere John Melle
World Trade Organization (WTO) and Multilateral Affairs Dawn Shackleford

The United States Trade Representative formulates trade policy for and directs all trade negotiations of the United States.

Organizational Chart

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative was created as the Office of the Special Representative for Trade Negotiations by Executive Order 11075 of January 15, 1963. The Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2171) established the Office as an agency of the Executive Office of the President charged with administering the trade agreements program.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/history

The Office sets and administers overall trade policy. The U.S. Trade Representative heads the Office and serves as the President's principal adviser, negotiator, and spokesperson on international trade and investment issues. The Representative acts as the chief representative of the United States in all General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade activities; in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development discussions, meetings, and negotiations that deal primarily with commodity issues and trade; in U.N. Conference on Trade and Development negotiations and other multilateral institution negotiations that deal primarily with commodity issues and trade; in other bilateral and multilateral negotiations that deal primarily with commodities or trade, including East-West trade; in negotiations under sections 704 and 734 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1671c and 1673c); and in negotiations on direct investment incentives and disincentives and on bilateral investment issues concerning barriers to investment.

The Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 codified these authorities and added additional authority, including the implementation of section 301 actions that enforce U.S. rights under international trade agreements.

The U.S. Trade Representative serves as a Cabinet-level official with the rank of Ambassador and reports directly to the President. The Chief Agricultural Negotiator and three Deputy U.S. Trade Representatives also hold the rank of Ambassador—two of the deputies are located in Washington, DC, and the other serves in Geneva, Switzerland.

The U.S. Trade Representative is also an ex officio member on the boards of directors of the Export-Import Bank and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. The Representative also serves on the National Advisory Council on International Monetary and Financial Policy.

https://ustr.gov/about-us

Sources of Information

Blog

"Tradewinds" is the official blog of the U.S. Trade Representative.

https://ustr.gov/tradewinds

Factsheets

The U.S. Trade Representative releases factsheets on trade issues.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/fact-sheets

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Requests must be made in writing: Freedom of Information Officer, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, 1724 F Street NW., Washington, DC 20508. Security procedures can slow down mail receipt and processing. Sending a request by email or fax avoids security-related delays. To facilitate finding the desired information, a record description must contain key details—author, date, recipient, subject matter, title or name. The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative operates a FOIA requestor service center. Phone, 202-395-3419. Fax, 202-395-9458.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/reading-room/freedom-information-act-foia | Email: FOIA@ustr.eop.gov

The electronic reading room contains information that is made available on a routine basis to the public. It also features documents that are frequently requested under the FOIA. This collection of online documents continues to grow as records in which the public expresses an interest are added.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/reading-room/freedom-information-act-foia/electronic-reading-room

History

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy created a new Office of the Special Trade Representative in the Executive Office of the President and designated two new Deputies, one in the Nation's capital and the other in Geneva, Switzerland. The rest of the story is available on the Web site of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/history

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative posted "Facts About Trade" to commemorate its 50th anniversary.

https://ustr.gov/50/facts

Key Issues

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative focuses it's trade policy on 14 issue areas: agriculture, economy and trade, enforcement, environment, government procurement, industry and manufacturing, intellectual property, labor, preference programs, services and investment, small business, textiles and apparel, trade and development, and trade organizations.

https://ustr.gov/issue-areas

Map

The United States has trade relations with more than 75 countries worldwide.

https://ustr.gov/countries-regions

North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

The Web site of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative features facts on the NAFTA.

https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/north-american-free-trade-agreement-nafta

Open Government

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative supports the Open Government initiative by promoting the principles of collaboration, participation, and transparency.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/open/around/eop/ustr

Press Releases

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative posts press releases on its Web site.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/press-releases

Reports / Publications

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative posts reports and publications on its Web site.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/reports-and-publications

Social Media

The U.S. Trade Representative tweets announcements and other newsworthy items on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/USTradeRep

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has a Facebook account.

https://www.facebook.com/USTradeRep

Speeches / Transcripts

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative posts transcriptions of public remarks made by its senior staff.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/speeches

Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T–TIP)

The Web site of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative features a T–TIP issue-by-issue information center.

https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/transatlantic-trade-and-investment-partnership-t-tip/t-tip

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

The Office of the U.S Trade Representative has answered frequently asked questions regarding the TPP on its Web site.

https://ustr.gov/tpp/#facts
https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office

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