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The Executive Office of the President

The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20500

http://www.whitehouse.gov

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On April 3, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt approved Public Law 76–19, which is also cited as the Reorganization Act of 1939. The Act reorganized Government agencies to save money: "The Congress hereby declares that by reason of continued national deficits beginning in 1931 it is desirable to reduce substantially Government expenditures and that such reduction may be accomplished . . . by proceeding immediately under the provisions of this Act" (53 Stat. 561). The reorganization sought to reduce expenditures and maintain efficient operation of Government; to increase efficiency of the operations of Government as much as possible within the revenues available; to group, coordinate, and consolidate Government agencies according to major purposes; to reduce the number of agencies through consolidation and termination; and to eliminate overlap and duplication.

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/76th-congress/session-1/c76s1ch36.pdf

On June 7, 1939, President Roosevelt approved Public Resolution 76–20, which acknowledged that "reorganization plan numbered I" had been submitted to the U.S. Congress on April 25, 1939, and that "reorganization plan numbered II" had been submitted on May 9, 1939. The joint resolution made the provisions of these two reorganization plans effective on July 1, 1939.

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/76th-congress/session-1/c76s1ch193.pdf

Under authority of the Reorganization Act of 1939, the President's two reorganization plans transferred various agencies to the Executive Office of the President. The contents of Reorganization Plan I and Reorganization Plan II of 1939 are codified in the appendix of 5 U.S.C.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title5/title5a/node84&edition=prelim

The National Archives published President Roosevelt's two reorganization plans that he had prepared and transmitted to the Senate and the House of Representatives, the first on April 25 and the second on May 9, in the Federal Register (4 FR 2727–2733) on July 1, 1939.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1939-07-01/pdf/FR-1939-07-01.pdf

On September 8, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an order that established five standing divisions of the Executive Office of the President and defined their functions and duties. The National Archives published Executive Order No. 8248 in the Federal Register (4 FR 3864) 4 days later.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1939-09-12/pdf/FR-1939-09-12.pdf

Presidents have continued to use Executive orders, reorganization plans, and legislative initiatives for reorganizing the Executive Office of the President to make its composition compatible with their administrative goals.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/the-executive-branch

REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Rules and regulations that are associated with the Executive Office of the President are codified in the first chapter, sections 100–199, of 3 CFR.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=6d49df89015aa267bedec9a29f6a2662&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title03/3chapterI.tpl

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of organizations in the Executive Office of the President have been assigned to record group 429.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/429.html

Career Opportunities

Applicants seeking noncareer positions may contact the Biden-Harris Administration by using an electronic form.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/join-us

Information on the White House Fellows program is available online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/fellows

Contact Information

Phone numbers for leaving comments and calling the White House switchboard and visitor's office are available on the "How You Can Write or Call the White House" web page. An email link that leads to an electronic message form is also available on the web page, as well as instructions for writing a letter, addressing the envelope, and sending it by postal mail.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/write-or-call

Disclosures

Strict rules govern the conduct of executive branch appointees and require every appointee in an executive branch agency to sign an ethics pledge. A waiver is permitted in cases where the literal application of the pledge is inconsistent with its purposes or is not in the public interest. Waivers that have been granted are posted online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/disclosures

On January 20, 2021, President Joseph R. Biden, Jr., signed "Executive Order 13989—Ethics Commitments by Executive Branch Personnel". This Executive Order was published in the Federal Register on January 25, 2021.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/DCPD-202100058/pdf/DCPD-202100058.pdf

Federal Register

Significant documents and documents that the Executive Office of the President recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/executive-office-of-the-president

Social Media

The White House has a Facebook account.

https://www.facebook.com/WhiteHouse

The White House tweets announcements and other newsworthy items on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/whitehouse

Staff Salaries

In June or July of 2021, the Biden-Harris Administration's first Annual report to Congress on White House Personnel for 2021 should be available in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading. The report contains professional information (e.g., name, status, salary, pay basis, and position title) about people who are associated with the Executive Office of the President. A link will be provided below after the report is released to the public.

The above Sources of Information were updated 3–2021.

White House Office

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20500

202-456-1414
http://www.whitehouse.gov

CHIEF OF STAFFRonald A. Klain
Counsel to the PresidentDana A. Remus
National Security AdvisorJacob J. Sullivan


Chief of Staff to the First LadyJulissa Reynoso Pantaleón
Deputy National Security AdvisorElizabeth Sherwood-Randall
Press SecretaryJennifer R. Psaki
Senior Advisor to the First LadyAnthony Bernal

ADVISORS

ADVISORS
Michael Donilon *
Cedric L. Richmond *

Homeland SecurityElizabeth Sherwood-Randall
ScienceEric S. Lander

ASSISTANTS TO THE PRESIDENT

ASSISTANTS TO THE PRESIDENT
Ronald A. Klain

Domestic PolicySusan E. Rice

SPECIAL ASSISTANTS
Climate and Science Agency PersonnelJeffrey Marootian
Climate PolicyDavid J. Hayes
Economic PolicyJoelle Gamble
ImmigrationTyler Moran

DEPUTY CHIEFS OF STAFF

DEPUTY CHIEFS OF STAFF
Jennifer O'Malley Dillon
Bruce Reed

DIRECTORS

DIRECTORS
CommunicationsKatherine Bedingfield
Intergovernmental AffairsJulie Rodriguez
Legislative AffairsLouisa Terrell
Management and AdministrationAnne Filipic
Oval Office OperationsAnnie Tomasini
Presidential CorrespondenceEva Kemp
Presidential PersonnelCatherine M. Russell
Public EngagementCedric L. Richmond
SpeechwritingVinay Reddy
White House Military OfficeMaju Varghese
White House PersonnelCatherine Russell

SPEECHWRITERS

SPEECHWRITERS
Amber Macdonald
Jeffrey Nussbaum

The White House Office serves the President in the performance of the many detailed activities incident to his immediate office.

ESTABLISHMENT

On September 8, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an order that established the divisions of the Executive Office of the President and defined their functions and duties. The National Archives published Executive Order No. 8248 in the Federal Register (4 FR 3864) 4 days later. The President's order established the White House Office as one of five divisions within the Executive Office. It also defined the Office's duties and functions as "to serve the President in an intimate capacity in the performance of the many detailed activities incident to his immediate office."

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1939-09-12/pdf/FR-1939-09-12.pdf

ACTIVITIES

The President's staff facilitates and maintains communication with the Congress, the heads of executive agencies, the press and other information media, and the general public. The various Assistants to the President aid the President in such matters as he or she may direct.

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that White House Office records have been assigned to record group 130.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/130.html

Career Opportunities

The White House Fellows program offers gifted and highly motivated young Americans firsthand experience with the process of governing the Nation and a sense of personal involvement in the leadership of society.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/fellows | Email: whitehousefellows@who.eop.gov

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID–19)

The Biden-Harris Administration is responding to the public health and economic crisis that the COVID-19 outbreak continues to cause. The President is pushing for action by the Federal Government to help protect and support caregivers, families, first responders, small-businesses owners, and others whose health or economic stability has been affected adversely.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/priorities/covid-19

Ethics Pledge

A list of waiver certifications for White House Office employees is posted in Portable Document Format (PDF), for viewing and downloading, at the bottom of the "Disclosures" web page, under the heading "Ethics Pledge Waivers."

https://www.whitehouse.gov/disclosures

Federal Register

Documents that the White House Office published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/the-white-house-office

The above Sources of Information were updated 1–2021.

EDITORIAL NOTE: A DEDICATED WEBSITE FOR THE OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT IS NOT AVAILABLE.

Office of the Vice President

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20501

202-456-7549
http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/vice-president-harris

CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE VICE PRESIDENTHartina Flournoy

ADVISORS TO THE VICE PRESIDENT
Domestic PolicyRohini Kosoglu
National SecurityNancy McEldowney

Chief SpokeswomanSymone Sanders
Director of CommunicationsAshley Etienne

ESTABLISHMENT

From the vice-presidency of John Adams in 1789 to that of Richard Nixon in the 1950s, presiding over the Senate was the Vice President's chief function. Each Vice President maintained an office in the Capitol, received staff support and office expenses through the legislative appropriations, and rarely was invited to participate in executive activities, including Cabinet meetings. In 1961, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson moved his chief office from the Capitol to the White House, directed his attention to executive functions, and started attending Senate sessions only at critical times. His actions changed the traditional role of the Vice President and his office, and those changes continue in effect today.

https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/President_Pro_Tempore.htm#1

ACTIVITIES

The Office of the Vice President supports the Vice President's in his or her executive and legislative roles. Within the executive branch of Government, the Vice President holds a position of second in command; within the legislative branch, he or she serves as President of the Senate. The Office's staff develops policy options on a variety of issues, ranging from tax and healthcare policy to foreign policy and national security. Its staff also works with Senators and Representatives to promote the President's legislative priorities in the U.S. Congress.

The Office also handles the Vice President's correspondence, events, scheduling, speechwriting, and travel.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/internships/presidential-departments

Sources of Information

Career Opportunities

The following Offices within the Office of the Vice President offer opportunities for young men and women: Administration, Advance for the Vice President, Communications, Counsel to the Vice President, Intergovernmental Affairs, Scheduling for the Vice President, and the Office of the Second Lady. The Departments of Domestic Policy and of Legislative Affairs also participate in the internship program.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/get-involved/internships/ | Email: intern_application@who.eop.gov

Ethics Pledge

A list of waiver certifications for Office of the Vice President employees is posted in Portable Document Format (PDF), for viewing and downloading, at the bottom of the "Disclosures" web page, under the heading "Ethics Pledge Waivers."

https://www.whitehouse.gov/disclosures

The above Sources of Information were updated 1–2021.

Council of Economic Advisers

Seventeenth and Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20502

202-456-4779
http://www.whitehouse.gov/cea

CHAIRCecilia E. Rouse

MembersJared Bernstein
Heather M. Boushey
https://www.whitehouse.gov/cea

The Council of Economic Advisers analyzes and appraises the national economy to make policy recommendations to the President.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On February 20, 1946, President Harry S. Truman signed Public Law 79–304, which is also cited as the Employment Act of 1946. The Act "created in the Executive Office of the President a Council of Economic Advisers" (60 Stat. 24).

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/79th-congress/session-2/c79s2ch33.pdf

On June 1, 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower prepared a reorganization plan and transmitted it to the U.S. Congress on June 1, 1953. Reorganization Plan No. 9 of 1953 became effective 2 months later on August 1st and was published in the Federal Register on August 3d.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1953-08-04/pdf/FR-1953-08-04.pdf

The Council continues to function under the Employment Act of 1946 and Reorganization Plan No. 9 of 1953 (5 U.S.C. app.).

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf142&num=0&edition=prelim

Public Law 112–166, which also is cited as the Presidential Appointment Efficiency and Streamlining Act of 2011, affected the appointment process of Council members. The Council comprises three members: one of whom serves as the Chair and another of whom serves as the Vice Chair. The President appoints the Chair by the advice and with the consent of the Senate. The President designates one of the members as Vice Chair, who acts as the Chair in his or her absence. Each Council member, "as a result of training, experience, and attainments," should be "exceptionally qualified to analyze and interpret economic developments, to appraise programs and activities of the Government . . . and to formulate and recommend national economic policy to promote full employment, production, and purchasing power under free competitive enterprise" (126 Stat. 1287–1288).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-126/pdf/STATUTE-126.pdf

STATUTORY AUTHORITIES

Statutory subject matter affecting the Council of Economic Advisers is codified in "Chapter 21—National Policy on Employment and Productivity" of 15 U.S.C. Section 1023 is dedicated to the Council of Economic Advisers.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title15-section1023&num=0&edition=prelim#sourcecredit

ACTIVITIES

The Council analyzes the national economy and its various sectors; advises the President on economic developments; appraises the economic programs and policies of the Federal Government; recommends policies for economic growth and stability to the President; assists in the preparation of the President's economic reports to the U.S. Congress; and prepares the "Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers."

https://www.whitehouse.gov/cea

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of the Council of Economic Advisers have been assigned to record group 459.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/459.html

Documents

The Government Publishing Office's govinfo website includes the Council of Economic Advisers in the list of executive branch authors on its "Browse by Government Author" web page.

https://www.govinfo.gov/app/browse/author

The above Sources of Information were updated 1–2021.

Council on Environmental Quality

722 Jackson Place NW., Washington, DC 20503

202-395-5750
202-456-6224
202-456-2710
http://www.whitehouse.gov/ceq

CHAIRBrenda Mallory
Members(vacancy)
(vacancy)

Chief of StaffMattew Lee-Ashley, Acting
General CounselJustin Pidot
Special AssistantSara Jordan
Federal Chief Sustainability OfficerAndrew Mayock

Senior Directors

Senior Directors
Building EmissionsMark Chambers
EmissionsAustin Brown
Environmental JusticeCecilia Martinez
LandsMattew Lee-Ashley
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) OversightJayni Hein
WaterSara Gonzalez-Rothi

The Council on Environmental Quality formulates and recommends national policies and initiatives for improving the environment.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On January 1, 1970, President Richard M. Nixon approved Public Law 91–190, which also is cited as the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. The Act established "a national policy for the environment" and provided "for the establishment of a Council on Environmental Quality" (83 Stat. 852). It created the Council (CEQ) in the Executive Office of the President. The CEQ is composed of three members, whom the President appoints by the advice and with the consent of the Senate. The President designates one of the members to serve as the Chair. Each Council member is required to be "exceptionally well qualified to analyze and interpret environmental trends and information of all kinds . . . to formulate and recommend national policies to promote the improvement of the quality of the environment" (83 Stat. 854).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-83/pdf/STATUTE-83-Pg852.pdf

On April 3, 1970, President Richard M. Nixon approved Public Law 91–224, which also is cited as the Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970. The Act established the Office of Environmental Quality (OEQ) in the Executive Office of the President. The CEQ Chair also serves as the Director of the OEQ. The President also appoints, by the Senate's advice and with its consent, the OEQ's deputy director (84 Stat. 114). The Office provides professional and administrative support for the Council. The CEQ and OEQ are referred to, collectively, as the Council on Environmental Quality.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-84/pdf/STATUTE-84-Pg91.pdf

STATUTORY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Statutory subject matter affecting the Council on Environmental Quality is codified in "Chapter 55—National Environmental Policy" of 42 U.S.C. Sections 4341–4347 are dedicated to the Council on Environmental Quality.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title42/chapter55&edition=prelim

Statutory subject matter affecting the Office of Environmental Quality is codified in "Chapter 56—Environmental Quality Improvement" of 42 U.S.C. Section 4372 is dedicated to the Office of Environmental Quality.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title42/chapter56&edition=prelim

Codified rules and regulations associated with the Council on Environmental Quality have been assigned to chapter V of 40 CFR, parts 1500–1599.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=3332dfb05e2ecdfa883fa40713ac3de3&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title40/40chapterV.tpl

ACTIVITIES

The Council develops policies that bring together the Nation's economic, social, and environmental priorities to improve Federal decisionmaking. As required by NEPA, the CEQ also evaluates, coordinates, and mediates Federal activities. It advises and assists the President on both national and international environmental policy matters. It oversees Federal agency and departmental implementation of NEPA.

The CEQ's Office of Federal Sustainability coordinates policy to promote energy and environmental sustainability across Federal Government operations. The Federal Government manages more than 350,000 buildings, operates more than 600,000 vehicles, and purchases annually more than $500 billion in goods and services.

https://www.sustainability.gov/index.html

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of the CEQ have been assigned to record group 580; however, that group does not have a description associated with it.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/index-numeric/501-to-600.html

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of the organizations in the Executive office of the President have been assigned to record group 429. Within that record group, the records of the Citizens' Advisory Committee on Environmental Quality (CACEQ) are located in subgroup 429.3. The CACEQ was established on May 29, 1969, and its members advised the newly established Environmental Quality Council.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/429.html

Contact Information

Contact information for the Office of Federal Sustainability is available on the "Contact Us" page of its website.

https://www.sustainability.gov/contact.html | Email: sustainability@ceq.eop.gov

Federal Register

Significant documents and documents that the CEQ recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/council-on-environmental-quality

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

The FOIA gives a person a right to request access to Federal agency records or information. An agency must disclose records that any person properly requests in writing. Pursuant to one or more of nine exemptions and three exclusions that the Act contains, a Federal agency may withhold certain records or parts of them. The FOIA applies only to Federal agencies and does not create a right of access to records held by the U.S. Congress, the courts, State or local government agencies, and private entities. The CEQ maintains an online requester service center.

News

The White House posts news items on energy and the environment.

Sustainability

The Federal Government is the Nation's largest energy consumer, managing over 350,000 buildings and operating over 600,000 vehicles. By increasing operational efficiency, Federal agencies reduce waste, save taxpayer dollars, lessen harmful effects on ecosystems, and support cleaner air, land, and water. Governmentwide performance data on sustainability goals are available on the website of the Office of Federal Sustainability.

https://www.sustainability.gov/performance.html | Email: sustainability@ceq.eop.gov

The above Sources of Information were updated 1–2021.

National Security Council

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20504

202-456-1414
http://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc

STATUTORY MEMBERS

STATUTORY MEMBERS
CHAIRJoseph R. Biden, Jr.
https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/president-biden
Lloyd J. Austin III
https://www.defense.gov/Our-Story/Meet-the-Team/Secretary-of-Defense
Kamala D. Harris
https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/vice-president-harris
Antony J. Blinken
https://www.state.gov/secretary

STATUTORY ADVISORS

STATUTORY ADVISORS
Avril Haines
https://www.dni.gov/index.php/who-we-are/leadership/director-of-national-intelligence
Gen. Mark A. Milley, USA
https://www.jcs.mil/Leadership/Article-View/Article/1974872/gen-mark-a-milley

STANDING PARTICIPANTS

STANDING PARTICIPANTS
Chief of Staff to the PresidentRonald A. Klain
Counsel to the PresidentDana A. Remus
Director of the National Economic CouncilBrian C. Deese
National Security AdvisorJacob J. Sullivan
Secretary of the TreasuryJanet L. Yellen
U.S. Representative to the United NationsLinda Thomas-Greenfield
https://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On July 26, 1947, President Harry S. Truman signed Public Law 80–253, which is also cited as the National Security Act of 1947. By enacting this legislation, the U.S. Congress sought "to provide for the establishment of integrated policies and procedures for the departments, agencies, and functions of the Government relating to the national security; to provide three military departments for the operation and administration of the Army, the Navy . . . and the Air Force, with their assigned combat and service components; to provide for their authoritative coordination and unified direction under civilian control but not to merge them; to provide for the effective strategic direction of the armed forces and for their operation under unified control and for their integration into an efficient team of land, naval, and air forces." The law established "a council to be known as the National Security Council" and stipulated that the President should preside over its meetings (61 Stat. 496).

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/80th-congress/session-1/c80s1ch343.pdf

The National Security Council (NSC) was placed in the Executive Office of the President by Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1949 (5 U.S.C. app.).

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf100&num=0&edition=prelim

The statutory members (PL 81–216) of the NSC—in addition to the President, who chairs the Council—are the Vice President and the Secretaries of State and Defense (63 Stat. 579). The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is the statutory military adviser to the NSC, and the Director of National Intelligence serves as its intelligence adviser. The Secretary of the Treasury, the U.S. Representative to the United Nations, the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, and the Chief of Staff to the President are invited to all meetings of the NSC. The Attorney General and the Director of National Drug Control Policy are invited to attend meetings pertaining to their jurisdictions, and other officials are invited, as appropriate.

http://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/81st-congress/session-1/c81s1ch412.pdf

STATUTORY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Codified content on the National Security Council from Section 101 of the National Security Act of 1947 was formerly located in "Chapter 15—National Security" of 50 U.S.C.and classified editorially as section 402. That content has been subsequently transferred to "Chapter 44—National Security" of 50 U.S.C. and editorially reclassified as section 3021.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title50/chapter44/subchapter1&edition=prelim

NSC rules and regulations are codified in 32 CFR 2100–2199. Within title 32, sections 2100–2199 constitute "Chapter XXI—National Security Council."

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=6df20eda89deafaa9405f41122a78691&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title32/32chapterXXI.tpl

ACTIVITIES

The NSC advises and assists the President, in conjunction with the National Economic Council, with the integration of all aspects of national security policy—domestic, economic, foreign, intelligence, and military—that affects the United States.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/nsc

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that NSC records have been assigned to record group 273.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/273.html

Federal Register

Documents that the NSC published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/national-security-council

The Sources of Information above were updated 2–2021.

EDITORIAL NOTE: A DEDICATED WEBSITE FOR THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION IS NOT AVAILABLE.

Office of Administration

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, 1650 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20503

202-456-2861

DIRECTOR(vacancy)
Deputy DirectorFaisal Amin

DEPUTY DIRECTORS OF MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTATION
Faisal Amin
OperationsDana Rosenzweig

General CounselDaniel Jacobson

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

The origins of the Office of Administration lie in Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1977, which President James E. Carter prepared and transmitted to the Senate and House of Representatives on July 15 of that same year. The new office was created to "provide components of the Executive Office of the President with such administrative services as the President shall from time to time direct."

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf183&num=0&edition=prelim

On December 12, 1977, President Carter signed Executive Order 12028 and formally established the Office of Administration within the Executive Office of the President. That Executive order was published in the Federal Register on December 14, 1977 (42 FR 62895). Transfers of records, property, personnel, and unexpended balances of appropriations to the Office of Administration became effective on April 1, 1978.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1977-12-14/pdf/FR-1977-12-14.pdf

The activities of the Director are subject to the direction or approval of the President. The Director organizes the Office of Administration, employs its staff, contracts for supplies and services, and carries out other duties that the President, as head of the Office, might do. In his or her capacity as the chief administrative officer of the Office, the Director ensures that it provides units within the Executive Office of the President with common administrative support and services.

ACTIVITIES

The Office of Administration is exclusively dedicated to providing uniform administrative support and services to all units that constitute the Executive Office of the President—except for services that are provided primarily in direct support of the President. The Office does, however, upon request, assist the White House Office with providing administrative services that are primarily in direct support of the President (42 FR 62895).

The common administrative support and services that the Office provides fall within the following general administrative areas: personnel management (e.g., equal employment opportunity programs); financial management; data processing; library, records, and information; and office and operations (e.g., graphics, mail, messenger, printing and duplication, procurement, supply, and word processing); and other support or services that can achieve savings and efficiency through centralization (ibid).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1977-12-14/pdf/FR-1977-12-14.pdf

Sources of Information

Federal Register

Documents that the Office of Administration published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/administration-office-executive-office-of-the-president

The above Sources of Information were updated 1–2021.

Office of Management and Budget

New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503

202-395-3080
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb

DIRECTOR(vacancy)
Deputy DirectorShalanda D. Young

Deputy Director for ManagementJason Miller—pending Senate confirmation
General CounselSamuel Bagenstos
Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator

ASSISTANT DIRECTORS

ASSISTANT DIRECTORS
Budget
Legislative Reference
Management and Operations

HEADS OF STATUTORY OFFICES

HEADS OF STATUTORY OFFICES
ADMINISTRATORS
Electronic Government and Information Technology
Federal Procurement Policy
Information and Regulatory Affairs

CONTROLLER
Federal Financial Management

The Office of Management and Budget assists the President in discharging budgetary, management, and other responsibilities; develops, coordinates, oversees, and implements Federal Government policies affecting financial management and procurement, rules and regulations, and information and statistics; and promotes better program and administrative management, develops measures for agency-performance, and improves coordination of operations within the executive branch.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On April 3, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt approved Public Law 76–19, which also is cited as the Reorganization Act of 1939 (53 Stat. 561). Pursuant to the Act, President Roosevelt prepared an appropriate plan of reorganization.

https://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/76th-congress/session-1/c76s1ch36.pdf

Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1939 transferred the Bureau of the Budget and its functions and personnel from the Department of the Treasury to the Executive Office of the President. President Roosevelt submitted the plan to the Senate and House of Representatives on April 25.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf86&num=0&edition=prelim

On July 1, 1939, the National Archives published President Roosevelt's reorganization plan in the Federal Register (4 FR 2727). The Bureau of the Budget was the forerunner of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1939-07-01/pdf/FR-1939-07-01.pdf

Pursuant to the provisions of chapter 9 of 5 U.S.C., President Richard M. Nixon prepared Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1970 and submitted it to the Senate and House of Representatives on March 12. The plan redesignated the Bureau of the Budget as the OMB.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title5a-node84-leaf177&num=0&edition=prelim

On May 23, 1970, the National Archives published the reorganization plan in the Federal Register (35 FR 7959).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1970-05-23/pdf/FR-1970-05-23.pdf

Pursuant to Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1970, President Nixon issued Executive Order 11541 on July 1, 1970. The Executive order prescribed the duties of the newly designated OMB and was published the next day, in the Federal Register (35 FR 10737).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1970-07-02/pdf/FR-1970-07-02.pdf

STATUTORY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Codified statutory material on money and finance has been assigned to 31 U.S.C. Chapter 5, which comprises sections 501–522, of that title is dedicated to statutory material affecting the OMB.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title31/subtitle1/chapter5&edition=prelim

"Subtitle A—Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements," which comprises parts 1–299, has been assigned to 2 CFR.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=76703d9ac3361ee46fdf902194fd8a1f&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title02/2subtitleA.tpl

"Chapter III—Office of Management and Budget," which comprises parts 1300–1399, has been assigned to 5 CFR. That CFR title contains codified rules and regulations whose contents deal with the subject of administrative personnel.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=be579a84626d26223245cc3a9139c7d9&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title05/5chapterIII.tpl

ACTIVITIES

The OMB's principle functions are diverse and many. They include assisting the President with the development of more effective Government and its maintenance by reviewing the organizational structure and management procedures of the executive branch; assisting with the development of efficient coordinating mechanisms for the implementation of Government activities and the expansion of interagency cooperation; assisting the President with preparation of the budget and formulation of the Government's fiscal program; supervising and controlling the administration of the budget; assisting the President with clearing and coordinating departmental advice on proposed legislation and with making recommendations to effect Presidential action on legislative enactments; assisting with the development of regulatory reform proposals and programs for paperwork reduction; assisting with the consideration, clearing, and preparation of proposed Executive orders and proclamations; planning and developing information systems that provide the President with program performance data; planning, conducting, and promoting evaluation efforts that help the President assess program efficiency, performance, and objectives; improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the procurement processes by guiding procurement policies, procedures, regulations, and use of forms; and informing the President of the progress of Government agency activities with respect to proposed, initiated, and completed work, together with the relative timing of work between agencies of the Government—to the end that the work programs of executive branch agencies may be coordinated and that the moneys the U.S. Congress appropriates may be expended with economy, barring overlapping and duplication of effort.

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that OMB records have been assigned to record group 051.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/051.html

Career Opportunities

In 2019, the OMB ranked 6th among 28 small Government agencies in the Partnership for Public Service's Best Places To Work Agency Rankings.

https://bestplacestowork.org/rankings/detail/BO00

Chief Financial Officers Council

The Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 (PL 101–576) established the Chief Financial Officers Council. The OMB's deputy director for management serves as the chair of the Council. The General Services Administration and the OMB jointly manage its website.

https://www.cfo.gov/about-the-council

Circulars

The OMB posts information and instructions that it issues to Federal agencies on its "Circulars" web page.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/information-for-agencies/circulars

Contact

Postal correspondence should be addressed to the Office of Management and Budget, 725 Seventeenth Street NW., Washington, DC 20503. Information and directory assistance are available. Phone, 202-395-3080.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb

Congressional inquiries may be made by phone. Phone, 202-395-4790. Congressional correspondence may be sent by facsimile. Fax, 202-395-3729.

Media inquiries may be made by email, facsimile, or phone. Fax, 202-395-3888. Phone, 202-395-7254.

Email: media@omb.eop.gov

Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency (CIGIE)

The Inspector General Reform Act of 2008 (PL 110–409) established the CIGIE as an independent entity within the executive branch. The OMB's deputy director for management serves as the executive chair of the Council.

https://www.ignet.gov/content/cigie-governing-documents

Federal Register

Significant documents and documents that the OMB recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/management-and-budget-office

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

To any person, the FOIA gives a statutory right for obtaining access to Government information in the records of executive branch agencies. This right to access has limits, when any of nine exemptions that are contained within the statute shield the requested information from disclosure. Information on how to submit a FOIA request is available online. The OMB's FOIA Requester Service Center also provides assistance. Phone, 202-395-3642.

Email: OMBFOIA@omb.eop.gov

Many OMB documents are freely available online and do not require a FOIA request for gaining access to them. These documents are called "proactive disclosures" because the OMB proactively posts them online. Documents that are disclosed in the interest of transparency and documents that have been requested frequently under the FOIA are examples of proactive disclosures. Before submitting a FOIA request, an information seeker should browse the holdings of the OMB's electronic FOIA library to see if the desired information has been posted already.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

The OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs posts answers to FAQs that deal with regulations, rules, and the process of making rules, on the website reginfo.gov.

https://www.reginfo.gov/public/jsp/Utilities/faq.myjsp

President's Budget

Past budgets of former Presidents are available in Portable Document Format (PDF) for viewing and downloading.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget

Publications

The U.S. Government Bookstore, which the Government Publishing Office maintains on its website, has many publications that deal with Federal deficits, Government budgets, and the Nation's economic outlook.

https://bookstore.gpo.gov/catalog/budget-economy | Email: mainbks@gpo.gov

Sequestration

The OMB posts sequestration reports on whitehouse.gov.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/legislative/sequestration-reports-orders

The above Sources of Information were updated 2–2021.

Office of National Drug Control Policy

Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC 20503

202-395-6700
202-395-6708
http://www.ondcp.gov

DIRECTORRegina M. LaBelle, Acting
Deputy DirectorRegina M. LaBelle

Chief of StaffMario Moreno
General CounselRobert Kent
Senior Policy AnalystTom Hill

Associate Directors

Associate Directors
Legislative AffairsAnne Sokolov
OutreachAriel Britt

The Office of National Drug Control Policy helps the President establish his National Drug Control Strategy objectives, priorities, and policies and makes budget, program, and policy recommendations affecting National Drug Control Program agencies.

ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION

On November 18, 1988, President Ronald W. Reagan approved Public Law 100–690 "to prevent the manufacturing, distribution, and use of illegal drugs, and for other purposes" (102 Stat. 4181). The 365-page piece of legislation contained a number of shorter acts, including the National Narcotics Leadership Act of 1988, which established the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) in the Executive Office of the President and became effective January 21, 1989 (102 Stat. 4189). At the head of the new Office, the Act placed a Director who is assisted by a Deputy Director for Demand Reduction and a Deputy Director for Supply Reduction. The Act also created a Bureau of State and Local Affairs within the Office (102 Stat. 4181).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-102/pdf/STATUTE-102-Pg4181.pdf

On October 21, 1998, President William J. Clinton approved Public Law 105–277, which made "omnibus consolidated and emergency appropriations" (112 Stat. 2681). The 920-page piece of legislation included the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 1998 (112 Stat. 2681–670). This Act of reauthorization created the new position of Deputy Director of National Drug Control Policy to assist the ONDCP Director (112 Stat. 2681–672).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-112/pdf/STATUTE-112-Pg2681.pdf

On December 29, 2006, President George W. Bush approved Public Law 109–469, which also is cited as the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 2006 (120 Stat. 3502). This Act of reauthorization made amendments to the earlier Act of 1998 and contained the following reporting provision: "The Deputy Director for Demand Reduction, the Deputy Director for Supply Reduction, and the Deputy Director for State, Local, and Tribal Affairs shall report directly to the Deputy Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy" (120 Stat. 3505).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-120/pdf/STATUTE-120-Pg3502.pdf

On October 24, 2018, President Donald J. Trump approved Public Law 115–271, which also is cited as the "SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act" (132 Stat. 3894). This 250-page piece of legislation included the Substance Abuse Prevention Act of 2018 (132 Stat. 4110), which reauthorized the ONDCP, expanded its mandate, and made other changes.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/PLAW-115publ271/pdf/PLAW-115publ271.pdf

The President appoints the ONDCP Director by the advice and with the consent of the Senate. The President also appoints the Deputy Director. Both of these appointees serve at the pleasure of the President.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title21/chapter22&edition=prelim

STATUTORY AND REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

Codified statutory material on food and drugs has been assigned to 21 U.S.C. Subchapter I, which comprises sections 1501–1509 of chapter 20, of that title, and is dedicated to statutory material affecting the ONDCP.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title21/chapter20/subchapter1&edition=prelim

Codified statutory material on food and drugs has been assigned to 21 U.S.C. Chapter 22, which comprises sections 1701–1715 of that title and is dedicated to statutory material affecting national drug control policy.

https://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title21/chapter22&edition=prelim

"Chapter III—Office of National Drug Control Policy," which comprises parts 1400–1499, has been assigned to 21 CFR. That CFR title contains codified rules and regulations whose content deals with the subjects of food and drugs.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=eadabaf406c904d7d3d6cdeb5ae6a7ec&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title21/21chapterIII.tpl

ACTIVITIES

The Director establishes policies, objectives, priorities, and performance measurements for the National Drug Control Program. Each year, the Director promulgates the President's National Drug Control Strategy, other related drug control strategies, supporting reports, and a program budget that the President submits to Congress. The Director advises the President on necessary changes in the organization, management, budgeting, and personnel allocation of Federal agencies that monitor drug activities. The Director also notifies Federal agencies if their policies do not comply with their responsibilities under the National Drug Control Strategy. The ONDCP also has direct programmatic responsibility for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) program and the Drug-Free Communities (DFC) support program.

The HIDTA program is a Federal grant program that the ONDCP administers. The program provides resources to Federal, State, local, and Tribal agencies for coordinating activities to address drug production and trafficking in designated areas nationwide.

The DFC support program is a Federal grant program that the ONDCP administers. The program provides grants to community coalitions for strengthening the local infrastructure to reduce drug use among youth and to maintain the reductions that are achieved.

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that records of the ONDCP have been assigned to record group 581; however, that group does not have a description associated with it.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/index-numeric/501-to-600.html#page-header

Career Opportunities

The ONDCP posts employment opportunities on USAJobs.gov.

https://www.usajobs.gov

Federal Register

Significant documents and documents that the ONDCP recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/office-of-national-drug-control-policy

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

To any person, the FOIA gives a statutory right for obtaining access to Government information in the records of executive branch agencies. This right to access has limits, when any of nine exemptions that are contained within the statute shield the requested information from disclosure. Information on how to submit a FOIA request is available online. The ONDCP's FOIA Requester Center also provides assistance. Phone, 202-395-6622. Fax, 202-395-5543.

Email: FOIA@ondcp.eop.gov

The above Sources of Information were updated 2–2021.

Office of Policy Development

The Office of Policy Development comprises the Domestic Policy and the National Economic Councils, which advise and assist the President in the formulation, coordination, and implementation of domestic and economic policy. The Office of Policy Development also supports other policy development and implementation activities as directed by the President.

Sources of Information

Federal Register

A document that the Office of Policy Development published in the Federal Register is accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/office-of-policy-development

EDITORIAL NOTE: A DEDICATED WEBSITE FOR THE DOMESTIC POLICY COUNCIL IS NOT AVAILABLE.

Domestic Policy Council

Room 469, Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20502

202-456-5594
http://www.whitehouse.gov/dpc

DOMESTIC POLICY COUNCIL

DOMESTIC POLICY COUNCIL
DIRECTORSusan E. Rice

DEPUTY DIRECTORS
Economic MobilityCarmel Martin
Health and Veterans AffairsChristen L. Young
ImmigrationEsther Olavarria
Racial Justice and EqualityCatherine Lhamon

On August 16, 1993, President William J. Clinton signed Executive Order 12859 to establish the Domestic Policy Council (DPC). The DPC oversees development and implementation of the President's domestic policy agenda, and it ensures coordination and communication among the heads of relevant Federal offices and agencies.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/WCPD-1993-08-23/pdf/WCPD-1993-08-23-Pg1638.pdf

EDITORIAL NOTE: A DEDICATED WEBSITE FOR THE NATIONAL ECONOMIC COUNCIL IS NOT AVAILABLE.

National Economic Council

Room 235, Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20502

202-456-2800
http://www.whitehouse.gov/nec

NATIONAL ECONOMIC COUNCIL

NATIONAL ECONOMIC COUNCIL
DIRECTORBrian C. Deese

DEPUTY DIRECTORSSameera Fazili
Financial Reform and Consumer ProtectionBharat Ramamurti

Chief Economist
Chief of Staff

On January 25, 1993, President William J. Clinton signed Executive Order 12835 to establish the National Economic Council (NEC). The NEC coordinates the economic policymaking process and advises the President on economic policy. The NEC also ensures that economic policy decisions and programs remain consistent with the President's stated goals, and it monitors the implementation of the President's economic goals.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/WCPD-1993-02-01/pdf/WCPD-1993-02-01-Pg95.pdf

Sources of Information

Federal Register

Documents that the NEC has published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/national-economic-council

History

The William J. Clinton Presidential Library posted video footage of President Clinton signing Executive Order 12835 and giving remarks on the establishment of the NEC. The signing and the remarks took place on on January 25, 1993. The President singled out the efforts of Robert E. Rubin, who served as the NEC's first Director after leaving the Goldman Sachs Group, Inc., in 1992.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39XBertis9A

The above Sources of Information were updated 2–2021.

Office of Science and Technology Policy

Eisenhower Executive Office Building, 1650 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20502

202-456-4444
202-456-6021
http://www.ostp.gov

DIRECTOREric S. Lander—pending Senate confirmation
Chief of Staff

Assistant Director, Federal Research and Development
Assistant Director, Legislative Affairs
Communications Director / Senior Policy Analyst
Deputy Chief of Staff / Assistant Director
General Counsel




OFFICE OF THE CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER
Chief Technology Officer

ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY DIVISION

ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY DIVISION
ASSISTANT DIRECTORS
Clean Energy and Transportation
Climate Adaptation and Ecosystems
Climate Resilience and Information
Climate Resilience and Land Use
Climate Science
Earth Observations
Environmental Health
Natural Disaster Resilience
Polar Sciences
Space Weather

NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DIVISION

NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DIVISION
ASSISTANT DIRECTORS
Biosecurity and Emerging Technologies
Cybersecurity
Cybersecurity Strategy
Defense Programs
Global Security
Special Programs

SCIENCE DIVISION

SCIENCE DIVISION
ASSISTANT DIRECTORS
Bioethics and Privacy
Broadening Participation
Education and Learning Science
Education and Physical Sciences
Research Infrastructure
Scientific Data and Information

TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION DIVISION

TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION DIVISION
ASSISTANT DIRECTORS
Behavioral Science
Biological Innovation
Civil and Commercial Space
Education and Telecommunications Innovation
Entrepreneurship
Innovation for Growth
Learning and Innovation
Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials
Open Innovation

BUDGET AND ADMINISTRATION

BUDGET AND ADMINISTRATION

COUNCILS

COUNCILS
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL OF ADVISORS ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Executive Director


NATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL
Executive Director
DIRECTORS
National Nanotechnology Coordination Office
Networking and Information Technology Research and Development National Coordination Office
U.S. Global Change Research Program National Coordination Office
U.S. Group on Earth Observation Program

The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) was established within the Executive Office of the President by the National Science and Technology Policy, Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 (PL 94–282).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-90/pdf/STATUTE-90-Pg459.pdf

The Office supports the President by serving as a source of engineering, scientific, and technological analysis and judgment on plans, policies, and programs of the Federal Government. OSTP experts advise the President on scientific and technological matters that affect areas of national concern like the economy, environment, foreign relations, health, and national security; evaluate the effectiveness, quality, and scale of the Federal effort in science and technology; advise and assist the President, the Office of Management and Budget, and Federal agencies throughout the Federal budget development process; and help the President with leading and coordinating the Federal Government's research and development programs.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ostp

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that OSTP records have been assigned to record group 364.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/359.html?_ga=2.140748923.870523185.1612200813-2031726786.1611773339

Contact Information

The "Contact OSTP" web page has information for contacting the Office by email, phone, and postal mail.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ostp/contact

Federal Register

Documents that the OSTP recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/science-and-technology-policy-office

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Instructions for submitting a FOIA request are available online.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/ostp/legal | Email: ostpfoia@ostp.eop.gov

Reports

National Science and Technology Council reports from 2009–2016 are posted online.

https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/administration/eop/ostp/nstc/docsreports

The above Sources of Information were updated 2–2021.

Office of the United States Trade Representative

600 Seventeenth Street NW., Washington, DC 20508

202-395-3230
http://www.ustr.gov

UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVEKatherine C. Tai
https://ustr.gov/about-us/biographies-key-officials

ASSISTANT U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVES

ASSISTANT U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVES
AdministrationFred Ames
AfricaConstance Hamilton
Agricultural Affairs and Commodity PolicyJulie Callahan
China AffairsTerrence J. McCartin
Congressional AffairsJan Beukelman
Environment and Natural ResourcesKelly K. Milton
Europe and the Middle EastL. Daniel Mullaney
Innovation and Intellectual PropertyDaniel Lee
Intergovernmental AffairsSirat Attapit
Japan, Korea, and Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) AffairsMichael Beeman
LaborLewis Karesh
Media and Public AffairsAdam Hodge
Monitoring and EnforcementJuan A. Millan
Private Sector Engagement(vacancy)
Public EngagementJulie Green
Services and InvestmentDaniel Bahar
Small Business, Market Access and Industrial CompetitivenessJames Sanford
South and Central AsiaChristopher Wilson
Southeast Asia and the PacificKarl Ehlers
TextilesWilliam D. Jackson
Trade Policy and EconomicsEdward Gresser
Western HemisphereDaniel Watson
World Trade Organization (WTO) and Multilateral AffairsDawn Shackleford
https://ustr.gov/about-us/organization

The United States Trade Representative formulates trade policy for and directs all trade negotiations of the United States.

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) was created as the Office of the Special Representative for Trade Negotiations by Executive Order 11075 of January 15, 1963 (28 FR 473–475).

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-1963-01-18/pdf/FR-1963-01-18.pdf

The Trade Act of 1974 (PL 93–618) established the Office of the USTR as an agency of the Executive Office of the President charged with administering the trade agreements program.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/STATUTE-88/pdf/STATUTE-88-Pg1978-2.pdf

The Office sets and administers overall trade policy. The USTR heads the Office and serves as the President's principal adviser, negotiator, and spokesperson on international trade and investment issues. The Representative acts as the chief representative of the United States in all General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade activities; in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development discussions, meetings, and negotiations that deal primarily with commodity issues and trade; in U.N. Conference on Trade and Development negotiations and other multilateral institution negotiations that deal primarily with commodity issues and trade; in other bilateral and multilateral negotiations that deal primarily with commodities or trade, including East-West trade; in negotiations under sections 704 and 734 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1671c and 1673c); and in negotiations on direct investment incentives and disincentives and on bilateral investment issues concerning barriers to investment.

The Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 codified these authorities and added additional authority, including the implementation of section 301 actions that enforce U.S. rights under international trade agreements.

The USTR serves as a Cabinet-level official with the rank of Ambassador and reports directly to the President. The Chief Agricultural Negotiator and three Deputy U.S. Trade Representatives also hold the rank of Ambassador—two of the deputies are located in Washington, DC, and the other serves in Geneva, Switzerland.

The USTR is also an ex officio member on the boards of directors of the Export-Import Bank and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. The Representative also serves on the National Advisory Council on International Monetary and Financial Policy.

https://ustr.gov/about-us

Sources of Information

Archived Records

The "Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States" indicates that USTR records have been assigned to record group 364.

https://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/364.html

Blog

"Tradewinds" is the official blog of the USTR.

https://ustr.gov/tradewinds

Contact Information

Email addresses and phone numbers are available on the "Contact Us" web page.

Members of the media may contact the Press Office to find answers to questions, to obtain information, or to schedule interviews.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office

Factsheets

The USTR releases factsheets on trade issues.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/fact-sheets

Federal Register

Documents that the Office of the USTR recently published in the Federal Register are accessible online.

https://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/trade-representative-office-of-united-states

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Requests must be made in writing: Freedom of Information Officer, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, 1724 F Street NW., Washington, DC 20508. Security procedures can slow down mail receipt and processing. Sending a request by email or fax avoids security-related delays. To facilitate finding the desired information, a record description must contain key details—author, date, recipient, subject matter, title or name. The Office of the USTR operates a FOIA requester service center. Phone, 202-395-3419. Fax, 202-395-9458.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/reading-room/foia | Email: FOIA@ustr.eop.gov

The electronic FOIA Library contains information that is made available on a routine basis to the public. It also features documents that are frequently requested under the FOIA. This collection of online documents continues to grow as records in which the public expresses an interest are added.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/reading-room/freedom-information-act-foia/foia-library

History

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy created a new Office of the Special Trade Representative in the Executive Office of the President and designated two new Deputies, one in the Nation's capital and the other in Geneva, Switzerland. The rest of the story is available on the website of the Office of the USTR.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/history

Key Issues

The Office of the USTR focuses it's trade policy on 14 issue areas: agriculture, economy and trade, enforcement, environment, government procurement, industry and manufacturing, intellectual property, labor, preference programs, services and investment, small business, textiles and apparel, trade and development, and trade organizations.

https://ustr.gov/issue-areas

Map

The United States has trade relations with more than 200 countries, territories, and regional associations worldwide.

https://ustr.gov/countries-regions

Organization Structure

the Office of the USTR does not have an organizational chart posted on its website; however, the "Organization Structure" web page does provide an outline of its structure that is based on five organizational lines of activities.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/organization/organization-structure

Press Releases

The Office of the USTR posts press releases on its website.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/press-releases

Reports / Publications

The Office of the USTR posts reports and publications on its website.

https://ustr.gov/about-us/policy-offices/press-office/reports-and-publications

Social Media

The Office of the USTR has a presence on social media: Flickr, Twitter, Vimeo, and YouTube.

https://ustr.gov/tradewinds/social

The above Sources of Information were updated 1–2021.